0
Original Research: COPD |

Role of Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms in Exacerbations of COPD*

Ivan E. Rascon-Aguilar, MD; Mark Pamer, DO; Peter Wludyka, PhD; James Cury, MD; David Coultas, MD; Louis R. Lambiase, MD; N. Stanley Nahman, MD; Kenneth J. Vega, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology (Drs. Lambiase and Vega), and Department of Internal Medicine, Office of Research Affairs (Drs. Rascon-Aguilar, Pamer, Wludyka, Cury, Coultas, and Nahman), University of Florida Health Science Center/Jacksonville, Jacksonville FL.

Correspondence to: Kenneth J. Vega, MD, University of Florida Health Science Center/Jacksonville, Division of Gastroenterology, 4555 Emerson Expressway, Suite 300, Jacksonville, FL 32207



Chest. 2006;130(4):1096-1101. doi:10.1378/chest.130.4.1096
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background and aims: The impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) on exacerbations of COPD has never been evaluated. The aims of this investigation were to determine the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms in COPD patients and the effect of GER on the rate of exacerbations of COPD per year.

Methods: A questionnaire-based, cross sectional survey was performed. Subjects were recruited from the outpatient pulmonary clinics at the University of Florida Health Science Center/Jacksonville. Included patients had an established diagnosis of COPD. Exclusion criteria were respiratory disorders other than COPD, known esophageal disease, active peptic ulcer disease, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, mastocytosis, scleroderma, and current alcohol abuse. Those meeting criteria and agreeing to participate were asked to complete the Mayo Clinic GERD questionnaire by either personal/telephone interview. Clinically significant reflux was defined as heartburn and/or acid regurgitation weekly. Other outcome measures noted were frequency and type of COPD exacerbations. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher exact test for categorical data and the independent t test for interval data.

Results: Eighty-six patients were enrolled and interviewed (mean age, 67.5 years). Male patients accounted for 55% of the study group. Overall, 37% of patients reported GER symptoms. The mean FEV1 percentage of predicted was similar in those with or without GER. The rate of exacerbations of COPD was twice as high in patients with GER symptoms compared to those without GER symptoms (3.2/yr vs 1.6/yr, p = 0.02).

Conclusions: The presence of GER symptoms appears to be associated with increased exacerbations of COPD.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543