0
Original Research: RESPIRATORY CARE |

Airflows Around Oxygen Masks*: A Potential Source of Infection?

David S. Hui, MD, FCCP; Margaret Ip, MBChB, MD; Julian W. Tang, MBChB, PhD; Alexandra L.N. Wong, BSc; Matthew T.V. Chan, MBChB, MD; Stephen D. Hall, BSc, PhD; Paul K.S. Chan, MBBS, MD; Joseph J.Y. Sung, MD, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Departments of Medicine and Therapeutics (Drs. Hui and Sung), Microbiology (Drs. Ip, P.K.S. Chan, and Tang), and Anesthesia and Intensive Care (Dr. M.T.V. Chan), and the Centre for Emerging Infectious Diseases (Ms. Wong), The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR, Peoples Republic of China; and the School of Mechanical Engineering (Dr. Hall), University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Correspondence to: Julian W. Tang, MBChB, PhD, Department of Microbiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong SAR, Peoples Republic of China; e-mail: julian.tang@cuhk.edu.hk



Chest. 2006;130(3):822-826. doi:10.1378/chest.130.3.822
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Patients with respiratory infections often require the use of supplemental oxygen via oxygen masks, which, in the hospital, may become sources of aerosolized infectious pathogens. To assess this risk, a human lung model (respiration rate, 12 breaths/min) was designed to test the potential for a simple oxygen mask at a common setting (4 L/min) to disperse potentially infectious exhaled air into the surrounding area. A laser sheet was used to illuminate the exhaled air from the mask, which contained fine tracer smoke particles. An analysis of captured digital images showed that the exhaled air at the peak of simulated exhalation reached a distance of approximately 0.40 m.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543