0
Original Research: ASTHMA |

Acute Relief of Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction by Inhaled Formoterol in Children With Persistent Asthma*

Mette Northman Hermansen, MD; Kim Gjerum Nielsen, MD; Frederik Buchvald, MD, PhD; Jakob Jessing Jespersen, MD; Thomas Bengtsson, MSc; Hans Bisgaard, MD, DMSci
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Pediatrics (Drs. Hermansen, Nielsen, Buchvald, Jespersen, and Bisgaard), Danish Pediatric Asthma Center, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hellerup, Denmark; and Clinical Science (Mr. Bengtsson), AstraZeneca R&D Lund, Lund, Sweden.

Correspondence to: Hans Bisgaard, MD, Department of Pediatrics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte, Niels Andersens Vej 65, DK-2900 Hellerup, Denmark; e-mail: Bisgaard@copsac.dk



Chest. 2006;129(5):1203-1209. doi:10.1378/chest.129.5.1203
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objective: To compare the acute bronchodilatory effect of the long-acting β2-agonist formoterol against the short-acting β2-agonist (SABA) terbutaline during exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) in children with asthma.

Design: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of the immediate effect of formoterol, 9 μg, vs terbutaline, 0.5 mg, and placebo administered as dry powder at different study days. Exercise challenge test was used as a model of acute bronchoconstriction.

Patients: Twenty-four 7- to 15-year-old children with persistent asthma.

Interventions: The children performed standardized treadmill exercise tests, breathing dry air, with a submaximal workload. Study medication was administered 5 min after exercise if FEV1 dropped ≥ 15% within 5 min after exercise. FEV1 and forced expiratory flows were measured repeatedly until 60 min after dose.

Results: Formoterol and terbutaline offered a significant acute bronchodilatory effect from 3 min after dose compared with placebo (p < 0.001). There was no difference between formoterol and terbutaline in FEV1 5 min after dose (p = 0.15), with a mean increase from each predrug baseline of 62% of the maximum increase for both. Median times to recovery within 5% of baseline FEV1 were 5.0 min and 7.4 min for formoterol and terbutaline, respectively (p = 0.33).

Conclusion: Single-dose formoterol, 9 μg, via dry powder inhaler provided an acute bronchodilatory effect similar to terbutaline during EIB in schoolchildren with persistent asthma. Formoterol is at least as effective as SABA and may be considered an alternative in the treatment of acute bronchoconstriction in school children.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543