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Original Research: SLEEP MEDICINE |

Atopy as a Risk Factor for Habitual Snoring at Age 1 Year*

Maninder Kalra, MD, MS; Grace LeMasters, PhD; David Bernstein, MD; Kimberly Wilson, MS; Linda Levin, PhD; Aliza Cohen, MA; Raouf Amin, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Division of Pulmonary Medicine (Drs. Kalra and Amin), Cincinnati Children‘s Hospital Medical Center; Department of Environmental Health (Drs. LeMasters and Levin), University of Cincinnati; Division of Allergy & Immunology (Dr. Bernstein), University of Cincinnati; and Division of Pediatric & Thoracic Surgery (Ms. Wilson and Ms. Cohen), Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH.

Correspondence to: Maninder Kalra, MD, MS, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati Children‘s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45229; e-mail: maninder.kalra@cchmc.org



Chest. 2006;129(4):942-946. doi:10.1378/chest.129.4.942
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Study objectives: To determine the prevalence of habitual snoring (HS) in 1-year-old children, and to assess the relationship between HS and atopic status in these children.

Design: Cross-sectional evaluation of a birth cohort selected from the population.

Setting: Ohio and Kentucky River Valley communities.

Participants: Children participating in the Cincinnati Childhood Allergy and Air Pollution Study (CCAAPS) were recruited for this study.

Measurements and results: At age 1 year, the children were evaluated for atopic status and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Parents were asked to complete a questionnaire pertaining to their snoring frequency and that of their child. Children with HS (snoring three or more times per week) were compared to those who either did not snore or snored less than three times per week. Data were available on 681 of the 700 children participating in CCAAPS study. Of these 681 children (377 boys and 304 girls), 542 were white (80%), 118 were African American (17%), and 21 were biracial or Asian (3%). The mean age (± SD) of our cohort at the time of assessment for snoring was 13.7 ± 2.6 months. Of the 681 children, 105 snored habitually (15%). There was a significant association between HS and the following: (1) positive atopic status (p = 0.005); (2) African-American race (p < 0.01); and (3) a history of snoring in the father (p < 0.01) or in the mother (p < 0.01). There was, however, no association between HS and ETS.

Conclusions: We found a 15% prevalence of HS in 1-year-old children born to atopic parents and a significant association with positive atopic status.


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Topics

atopy ; snoring

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