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Correspondence |

It’s Pneumocystis jiroveci Not Pneumocystis carinii FREE TO VIEW

Ritesh Agarwal, MD; Chandana Reddy, MD; Ashutosh N. Aggarwal, MD; Akshay K. Saxena, MD
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India,  Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN

Correspondence to: Ritesh Agarwal, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector-12, Chandigarh-160012, India; e-mail: riteshpgi@gmail.com



Chest. 2006;129(2):498. doi:10.1378/chest.129.2.498
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To the Editor:

We read with interest the article by Sharma et al (September 2005).1However, it was surprising to see the terminology used to describe human Pneumocystis infection. The organism that causes human Pneumocystis pneumonia has now been named Pneumocystis jiroveci at a Pneumocystis nomenclature meeting in 2001 at the 7th International Workshop on Opportunistic Protists, in honor of the Czech parasitologist Otto Jırovec, one of the first researchers to describe Pneumocystis infection in humans.2 In the last 2 years, numerous claims have been made to change this terminology.34

To assess the impact and usage of this terminology we searched MEDLINE using the MeSH terms “pneumocystis pneumonia,” “Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia,” “Pneumocystis jirovei pneumonia,” and “pneumonia in the immunocompromised” between January 9, 2003 and January 9, 2005. In addition, we hand searched the CHEST for articles on human Pneumocystis published in the last 2 years. We gave a lag period of 2 years from the publication of the original reference2 to allow for the dissemination of the new terminology.

Our search yielded 231 citations; these articles used the terms “Pneumocystis carinii,” “Pneumocystis jirovei,” and “pneumocystis pneumonia” 56.7%, 27.7%, and 15.6% of the time, respectively, to describe human Pneumocystis infection. Furthermore, a hand search of the CHEST yielded 43 citations, and again “Pneumocystis carinii” was the most prevalent term (35 of 43 citations, 81.2%). Thus, one can see that the terminology of human Pneumocystis infection has not widely percolated in the literature. In fact, the above search is likely to be an underestimate because when we hand searched CHEST, we found 43 references that described the human Pneumocystis infection, whereas our MEDLINE search yielded only 5 references from CHEST.

In conclusion, P carinii should now only be used to describe the rat-derived infection, and P jirovei to describe human infection. The acronym “PCP” used to describe human Pneumocystis pneumonia should mean “PneumoCystis Pneumonia.”

Sharma, S, Nadrous, HF, Peters, SG, et al (2005) Pulmonary complications in adult blood and marrow transplant recipients: autopsy findings.Chest128,1385-1392. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Proceedings of the 7th International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists. Cincinnati, OH, June 13–16, 2001.J Eukaryot Microbiol2001;Suppl,1S-204S. [PubMed]
 
Agarwal, R The acronym “PCP” isPneumocystis pneumonia, notPneumocystis cariniipneumonia.AJR Am J Roentgenol2005;185,1653-1654. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Miller, R Pneumocystis pneumonia in humans is caused byP jirovecinotP carinii.Thorax2004;59,83. [PubMed]
 
To the Editor:

We thank Agarwal and colleagues for their comments about our study (September 2005),1 entitled “Pulmonary Complications in Adult Blood and Marrow Transplant Recipients: Autopsy Findings.” We agree with them that we should have used the term Pneumocystis jiroveci instead of Pneumocystis carinii in our article. We apologize for our mistake.

References
Sharma, S, Nadrous, HF, Peters, SG, et al Pulmonary complications in adult blood and marrow transplant recipients: autopsy findings.Chest2005;128,1385-1392. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 

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References

Sharma, S, Nadrous, HF, Peters, SG, et al (2005) Pulmonary complications in adult blood and marrow transplant recipients: autopsy findings.Chest128,1385-1392. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Proceedings of the 7th International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists. Cincinnati, OH, June 13–16, 2001.J Eukaryot Microbiol2001;Suppl,1S-204S. [PubMed]
 
Agarwal, R The acronym “PCP” isPneumocystis pneumonia, notPneumocystis cariniipneumonia.AJR Am J Roentgenol2005;185,1653-1654. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Miller, R Pneumocystis pneumonia in humans is caused byP jirovecinotP carinii.Thorax2004;59,83. [PubMed]
 
Sharma, S, Nadrous, HF, Peters, SG, et al Pulmonary complications in adult blood and marrow transplant recipients: autopsy findings.Chest2005;128,1385-1392. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
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