0
Original Research: SLEEP MEDICINE |

Improvement in Nocturnal Disordered Breathing After First-Ever Ischemic Stroke*: Role of Dysphagia

Miguel Angel Martínez-García, MD; Rafael Galiano-Blancart, MD; Juan-José Soler-Cataluña, MD; Luis Cabero-Salt, MD; Pilar Román-Sánchez, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Pneumology (Drs, Martínez-García and Soler-Cataluña) and Neurology Units (Dr. Galiano-Blancart), Service of Internal Medicine (Drs. Cabero-Salt and Román-Sánchez), Requena General Hospital, Valencia, Spain.

Correspondence to: Miguel Angel Martínez-García, MD, Hospital General de Requena, Unidad de Neumología (Servicio de Medicina Interna), Paraje Casa Blanca s/n, 46320-Requena, Valencia, Spain; e-mail: med013413@nacom.es



Chest. 2006;129(2):238-245. doi:10.1378/chest.129.2.238
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the role of dysphagia as a model of pharyngeal muscle dysfunction in the time course of nocturnal disordered breathing (NDB) in patients who experienced a first-ever ischemic stroke.

Design: Prospective study.

Patients and interventions: Fifty-nine consecutive patients (mean age, 73.2 years; SD, 12.8 years) were studied. Clinical sleep and neurologic data and vascular risk factors were recorded. Two nocturnal studies using a portable autotitration device (AutoSet Portable Plus II system; ResMed; Sydney, NSW, Australia) were performed in both the acute phase (mean duration, 1.23 days; SD, 0.7 day) and the stable phase (mean duration 65.9 days; SD, 12.5 days) of the neurologic event in all patients.

Results: The mean total apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) measured with the autotitration device in the acute phase was 34.9 (SD, 25.2) vs 20.1 (SD, 21.7) in the stable phase, both with predominance of obstructive apnea. Patients with dysphagia (n = 30) showed the largest number of obstructive apneic episodes (OAIs) in the acute phase (AHI, 40 episodes; OAI, 30.4 episodes), with a significant reduction in this type of apnea during the stable phase of stroke (AHI, 24.7 episodes; OAI, 17.7 episodes), coinciding with the recovery of pharyngeal muscle function. In contrast, nondysphagic patients (n = 29) showed no significant changes in NDB from the acute to the stable phase of stroke. Logistic regression analysis found dysphagia to be the best independent predictor of AHI reduction of > 50% from baseline (odds ratio, 13.4; 95% confidence interval, 3.3 to 39.6; p = 0.001).

Conclusion: The present study shows significant improvement in the number obstructive apneic events occurring in the stable phase of a first-ever ischemic stroke in patients with transient pharyngeal muscle alterations secondary to the neurologic lesion.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543