0
Original Research: INFECTION |

Clinical Significance of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolated From Respiratory Specimens in Korea*

Won-Jung Koh, MD; O. Jung Kwon, MD; Kyeongman Jeon, MD; Tae Sung Kim, MD; Kyung Soo Lee, MD; Young Kil Park, PhD; Gill Han Bai, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Departments of Medicine (Drs. Koh, Kwon, and Jeon) and Radiology (Drs. Kim and Lee), Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine; and Korean Institute of Tuberculosis (Drs. Park and Bai), Korean National Tuberculosis Association, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Correspondence to: O. Jung Kwon, MD, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-ku, Seoul, Republic of Korea; e-mail: ojkwon@smc.samsung.co.kr



Chest. 2006;129(2):341-348. doi:10.1378/chest.129.2.341
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: Precise epidemiologic data regarding nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) lung infection in many Asian countries have been relatively unavailable. In order to determine the clinical significance of NTM isolated from respiratory specimens, we reviewed medical records from all patients from whom NTM isolates were recovered within a 2-year period.

Materials and methods: We identified all NTM isolates from respiratory specimens at the Samsung Medical Center (Seoul, South Korea) obtained from January 2002 to December 2003. We then reviewed the clinical and radiologic characteristics of the patients from whom NTM was isolated. Patients were classified as having either definite, probable, or unlikely NTM lung disease, as defined by the guidelines of both the American Thoracic Society and the British Thoracic Society.

Results: During the study period, 1,548 NTM isolates were recovered from 794 patients. Of these 794 patients, 131 patients (17%) were determined to have definite NTM lung disease, and 64 patients (8%) were designated as probable disease candidates. The most commonly involved organisms in the definite and probable NTM lung disease cases were Mycobacterium avium complex (n = 94, 48%) and Mycobacterium abscessus (n = 64, 33%). In 195 patients with NTM lung disease, 82 patients (42%) manifested the upper lobe cavitary form, 101 patients (52%) exhibited the nodular bronchiectatic form, and 12 patients (6%) exhibited the unclassifiable form.

Conclusions: About one fourth of the patients in whom NTM was isolated from respiratory specimens were found to have clinically significant NTM lung infections. The spectrum of organisms responsible for the NTM lung disease in these Korean patients differed from those reported in other regions of the world. However, the estimates of clinical significance in this study may be underestimates due to the retrospective analysis. Some of the patients might have “true” NTM lung disease that could be diagnosed with continued evaluation and follow-up.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
Infant/toddler pulmonary function tests-2008 revision & update.
American Association for Respiratory Care | 4/3/2009
Removal of the endotracheal tube—2007 revision & update.
American Association for Respiratory Care | 8/17/2007
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543