0
Clinical Investigations: COPD |

A Multidimensional Grading System (BODE Index) as Predictor of Hospitalization for COPD*

Kian-Chung Ong, FRCP (Edin); Arul Earnest, MSc; Suat-Jin Lu, MBBS
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Respiratory Medicine (Dr. Ong and Mr. Earnest) and Clinical Research Unit (Dr. Lu), Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore.

Correspondence to: Kian-Chung Ong, FRCP (Edin), Department of Respiratory Medicine, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, Singapore 308433; e-mail: kian_chung_ong@ttsh.com.sg



Chest. 2005;128(6):3810-3816. doi:10.1378/chest.128.6.3810
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: We hypothesized that the BODE (body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnea, and exercise capacity) index would better predict hospitalization for COPD than FEV1 alone, and the purpose of this study was to test this hypothesis in a cohort of patients with COPD.

Design: Historical cohort study.

Setting: University-affiliated hospital.

Patients: One hundred twenty-seven patients with COPD recruited from the outpatient clinic of a single institution were followed up for a mean period of 16.2 months.

Measurements: The BODE index was calculated for each patient using variables obtained within 4 weeks of enrollment. The main outcome measure was the number of hospital admissions for COPD during follow-up. We used the Poisson regression model to quantify and compare the relationship between FEV1 and BODE scores with the number of hospital admissions.

Results: During the follow-up period, 47% of patients required at least one hospital admission and 17% died. Using Poisson regression analysis, a significant effect of BODE score on the number of hospital admissions was found (incidence rate ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15 to 1.25; p < 0.001). In comparison, there was a significant but smaller effect of the FEV1 percentage of predicted on the number of hospital admissions (incidence rate ratio, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.16; p < 0.001). When categorizing the BODE scores into four quartiles, we found that the BODE index is also a better predictor of hospital admissions than the staging system of COPD as defined by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease. The pseudo r2 using quartiles of the BODE index as the predictor was 0.16, as compared to 0.04 for stages of severity based on FEV1.

Conclusions: The BODE staging system, which includes in addition to FEV1 other physiologic and clinical variables, helps to better predict hospitalization for COPD.


Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543