0
Occupational and Environmental Lung Disease |

Occupational Asthma and Occupational Rhinitis in Hairdressers*

Gianna Moscato, MD; Patrizia Pignatti, PhD; Mona-Rita Yacoub, MD; Canzio Romano, MD; Sandro Spezia; Luca Perfetti, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Allergy and Immunology Unit (Drs. Moscato, Pignatti, Yacoub, and Perfetti), Fondazione “Salvatore Maugeri,” Institute of Research and Care, Scientific Institute of Pavia; Allergy and Pneumology Unit (Dr. Romano), Department of Traumatology, Orthopaedics and Occupational Medicine, University of Torino, Torino; and Laboratorio di Igiene Ambientale e di Tossicologia Industriale (Mr. Spezia), Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, IRCCS, Scientific Institure of Pavia, Pavia, Italy.

Correspondence to: Gianna Moscato, MD, Servizio di Allergologia e Immunologia Clinica, Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, IRCCS, Località Cravino, 27100 Pavia, Italy; e-mail: gmoscato@fsm.it



Chest. 2005;128(5):3590-3598. doi:10.1378/chest.128.5.3590
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background: Hairdressers are at risk for occupational respiratory diseases, but the risk factors, causal agents, and underlying mechanisms are not completely defined.

Aim: To describe the features of a large group of hairdressers consecutively referred to our center for suspected occupational asthma (OA) over an 8-year period, the type of occupational respiratory diseases, the etiologic agents, and the diagnostic tests.

Results: Forty-seven hairdressers (mean age, 25 years; range, 17 to 52 years) were studied. On the basis of the response to the specific inhalation challenge (SIC), 24 patients received a diagnosis of OA (51.1%), which was due to persulfate salts in 21 patients (87.5%), permanent hair dyes in 2 patients (8.3%), and latex in 1 patient (4.2%). Thirteen of these 24 patients (54.2%) also received a diagnosis of occupational rhinitis, which was due to persulfate salts in 11 patients (84.6%) and to paraphenylenediamine in two patients (15.4%). Patients with persulfate asthma had a long period of exposure to bleaching agents, a long latent period between the start of exposure and the onset of symptoms, and a prevalent eosinophilic airway inflammation in induced sputum. The skin-prick test with ammonium persulfate performed in a subset of patients gave negative results

Conclusions: In the present study, we confirmed that persulfate salts are the major agents involved in OA and occupational rhinitis in hairdressers. The positive response to the SIC in only a part of the population of symptomatic exposed workers, the period between the starting of exposure and the onset of symptoms, the type of response to the SIC, and the high frequency of association of asthma with other diseases such as dermatitis and rhinitis suggest an immunologic mechanism that remains to be elucidated.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) 2010 revision.
Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma Workshop Group
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543