0
Clinical Investigations: COPD |

Antiprotease Function of Airway Secretions in Purulent Tracheobronchitis*

Thomas G. O’Riordan, MD; Lori B. Seischab, PhD; Qi-Long Ying, PhD; Eliseo Colon-Carreras, MD; Bilal Chughtari, BA; Lucy B. Palmer, MD, FCCP; Sanford R. Simon, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Departments of Pathology and Biochemistry (Drs. Seischab, Ying, and Simon, and Mr. Chughtari), and Division of Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine (Drs. Colon-Carreras, Palmer, and O’Riordan), Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY.

Correspondence to: Lori B. Seischab, PhD, Department of Biology, 132 Natural Science Building, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC 28723; e-mail: lseischab@wcu.edu



Chest. 2005;128(5):3167-3176. doi:10.1378/chest.128.5.3167
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: Unopposed activity of the serine protease, human leukocyte elastase (HLE), is detectable in the airways of patients with purulent tracheobronchitis. The aim of this study was to assess the compartmentalization of HLE activity in the liquid sol phase and the solid gel phase of airway secretions.

Design: Seventy samples of tracheobrochial aspirates were obtained from patients who had hypersecretion and were receiving mechanical ventilation.

Methods: Samples were separated into sol and gel (“mucous pellet”) phases, and HLE activity was measured using chromogenic substrate degradation. HLE was eluted from the mucous pellet using hypertonic saline solution, 1 mol/L, or bovine pancreatic deoxyribonuclease (DNase), 16 μmol/L.

Results: HLE activity partitioned between the sol and gel phases of the secretions, with most of the activity present in the gel phase (32:1 ratio of gel to sol HLE activity). The activity of HLE was 95% inhibited when bound to the gel phase, but activity appeared to be largely restored after elution from the gel phase. The gel phase was capable of binding additional exogenous HLE, and its binding capacity for exogenous HLE was not saturated by concentrations that exceeded the highest clinically relevant HLE levels (1.1 mg/mL). Hypertonic saline solution and DNase I efficiently liberated endogenous and exogenous gel phase-bound HLE activity, suggesting that electrostatic bonds and DNA, respectively, play important roles in binding HLE to the gel phase.

Conclusions: The solid phase of airway secretions is a more important modulator of elastase-antielastase balance than has been previously recognized.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Topics

gel ; trachea

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543