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Clinical Investigations: COPD |

Effects of Lung Volume Reduction Surgery on Sleep Quality and Nocturnal Gas Exchange in Patients With Severe Emphysema*

Samuel L. Krachman, DO, FCCP; Wissam Chatila, MD, FCCP; Ubaldo J. Martin, MD, FCCP; Thomas Nugent, MD; Joseph Crocetti, DO; John Gaughan, PhD; Gerard J. Criner, MD, FCCP; for the National Emphysema Treatment Trial Research Group
Author and Funding Information

*From the Divisions of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (Dr. Krachman, Chatila, Martin, Nugnet, Crocetti, and Criner) and Biostatistics (Dr. Gaughan), Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA.

Correspondence to: Samuel L. Krachman, DO, FCCP, Temple University School of Medicine, 767 Parkinson Pavilion, Broad and Tioga Sts, Philadelphia, PA 19140; e-mail: krachms@TUHS.temple.edu



Chest. 2005;128(5):3221-3228. doi:10.1378/chest.128.5.3221
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Study objectives: We hypothesized that associated with improvements in respiratory mechanics, lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) would result in an improvement in both sleep quality and nocturnal oxygenation in patients with severe emphysema.

Design: Prospective randomized controlled trial.

Setting: University hospital.

Patients: Sixteen patients (10 men, 63 ± 6 years [± SD]) with severe airflow limitation (FEV1, 28 ± 10% predicted) and hyperinflation (total lung capacity, 123 ± 14% predicted) who were part of the National Emphysema Treatment Trial.

Interventions and measurements: Patients completed 6 to 10 weeks of outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation. Spirometry, measurement of lung volumes, arterial blood gas analysis, and polysomnography were performed prior to randomization and again 6 months after therapy. Ten patients underwent LVRS and optimal medical therapy, while 6 patients received optimal medical therapy only.

Results: Total sleep time and sleep efficiency improved following LVRS (from 184 ± 111 to 272 ± 126 min [p = 0.007], and from 45 ± 26 to 61 ± 26% [p = 0.01], respectively), while there was no change with medical therapy alone (236 ± 75 to 211 ± 125 min [p = 0.8], and from 60 ± 18 to 52 ± 17% [p = 0.5], respectively). The mean and lowest oxygen saturation during the night improved with LVRS (from 90 ± 7 to 93 ± 4% [p = 0.05], and from 83 ± 10 to 86 ± 10% [p = 0.03], respectively), while no change was noted in the medical therapy group (from 91 ± 5 to 91 ± 5 [p = 1.0], and from 84 ± 5 to 82 ± 6% [p = 0.3], respectively). There was a correlation between the change in FEV1 and change in the lowest oxygen saturation during the night (r = 0.6, p = 0.02). In addition, there was an inverse correlation between the change in the lowest oxygen saturation during the night and the change in residual volume (− r = 0.5, p = 0.04) and functional residual capacity (− r = 0.6, p = 0.03).

Conclusion: In patients with severe emphysema, LVRS, but not continued optimal medical therapy, results in improved sleep quality and nocturnal oxygenation. Improvements in nocturnal oxygenation correlate with improved airflow and a decrease in hyperinflation and air trapping.

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