0
Clinical Investigations: Miscellaneous |

Use of CT Morphometry To Detect Changes in Lung Weight and Gas Volume*

Andrew Perez, IV, MD; Harvey O. Coxson, PhD; James C. Hogg, MD, PhD; Kevin Gibson, MD; Paul F. Thompson, BS; Robert M. Rogers, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine (Dr. Perez and Mr. Thompson) and Dorothy P. and Richard P. Simmons Center for Interstitial Lung Diseases (Drs. Gibson and Rogers), University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA; Department of Radiology (Dr. Coxson), Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC; and James Hogg iCAPTURE Centre for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research (Dr. Hogg), St. Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC.

Correspondence to: Robert M. Rogers, MD, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, NW 628 MUH, 3459 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; e-mail: rogersrm@upmc.edu



Chest. 2005;128(4):2471-2477. doi:10.1378/chest.128.4.2471
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: CT estimates of lung density have been used to estimate the extent and severity of emphysema. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that quantitative CT can track the changes that occur in diffuse lung disease.

Design: The study was based on five patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) who underwent lung lavage. Pulmonary function was measured before and after each individual lung lavage, and the CT scans before and after lavage were used to compare total lung volume, airspace volume, lung weight, and regional lung inflation. The dry weight of proteinaceous material lavaged from the lung was measured and compared to the change in CT lung weight.

Results: All the patients showed improvements in dyspnea, percentage of predicted diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide, and FVC. There was no change in CT-measured total lung volume or airspace volume, but there was a reduction in lung weight following lavage (p = 0.001), which correlated with the dry weight of the lavage effluent (R2 = 0.73). Therefore, there was a shift in the regional lung inflation toward a more inflated lung with a corresponding increase in the mean lung inflation (p = 0.001).

Conclusion: These data show that quantitative CT can objectively track the changes in lung weight and airspace inflation produced by a standard intervention in PAP, and we postulate that it can provide similar information about the progression of other diffuse lung diseases.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543