0
Clinical Investigations: INFECTION |

Clinical Characteristics and Treatment Responses of Tuberculosis in Patients With Malignancy Receiving Anticancer Chemotherapy*

Deog Kyeom Kim, MD; Sei Won Lee, MD; Chul-Gyu Yoo, MD; Young Whan Kim, MD; Sung Koo Han, MD; Young-Soo Shim, MD; Jae-Joon Yim, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Lung Institute of Medical Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Correspondence to: Jae-Joon Yim, MD, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-Dong, Chongno-Gu, Seoul, 110-744, Republic of Korea; e-mail: yimjj@snu.ac.kr



Chest. 2005;128(4):2218-2222. doi:10.1378/chest.128.4.2218
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: The aim of this study was to elucidate the clinical characteristics and treatment responses of tuberculosis developing in patients receiving anticancer chemotherapy.

Design: Retrospective case-control study.

Setting: The Seoul National University Hospital, a tertiary referral hospital in South Korea.

Patients: From January 1, 2000, to July 31, 2004, patients with tuberculosis detected during the course of anticancer chemotherapy were enrolled as cases. Age- and sex-matched tuberculosis patients without any malignant disease were selected as control subjects.

Measurements and results: Twenty-four patients and 48 control subjects were enrolled. Their mean ± SD age was 56.3 ± 14.3 years, and the male-to-female ratio was 3:1. The most common malignancy was gastric cancer (43%). Lymphoma (17%), lung cancer (8%), and head and neck cancer (8%) were also common. In both groups, the lung was the most common site of tuberculosis involvement (87.8% and 79.2%, retrospectively). The presence of scar tissue suggesting old tuberculosis on radiography was more common in patients with tuberculosis receiving anticancer chemotherapy (66.7% vs 43.8%, p = 0.07). No difference in radiographic severity was observed between groups. A regimen based on first-line antituberculosis drugs was started in all subjects. Frequency of completion of the expected antituberculosis chemotherapy was lower in patients with tuberculosis developing with anticancer chemotherapy (58.3% vs 79.2%, p = 0.02), but it was not different after excluding the loss due to progression of underlying malignancies. Bacteriologic/radiographic responses to treatment and toxicity of antituberculosis medication sufficient to change or stop treatment were not different in both groups.

Conclusions: With regard to radiographic and clinical responses to antituberculosis treatment, tuberculosis developing during anticancer chemotherapy is not clinically different from tuberculosis developing in ordinary situations. Findings in this study suggest that anticancer chemotherapy is not an obstacle in treating tuberculosis.


Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
Oncology evidence-based nutrition practice guideline.
American Dietetic Association | 1/2/2009
Palliative treatment of cancer.
Finnish Medical Society Duodecim | 1/18/2008
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543