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Clinical Investigations: SURGERY |

Advanced Age Is Not Correlated With Either Short-term or Long-term Postoperative Results in Lung Cancer Patients In Good Clinical Condition*

Shigeki Sawada, MD, PhD; Eisaku Komori, MD, PhD; Naoyuki Nogami, MD, PhD; Akihiro Bessho, MD, PhD; Yoshihiko Segawa, MD, PhD; Tetsu Shinkai, MD, PhD; Masao Nakata, MD, PhD; Motohiro Yamashita, MD, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Departments of Thoracic Surgery (Drs. Sawada, Komori, and Yamashita) and Medical Oncology (Drs. Nogami, Bessho, Segawa, and Shinkai), National Hospital Organization Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime; and Division of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Dr. Nakata), Kawasaki Medical School, Kawasaki, Japan.

Correspondence to: Shigeki Sawada, MD, PhD, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Shikoku Cancer Center, Horinouchi 13, Matsuyama, Ehime, 790-0007, Japan



Chest. 2005;128(3):1557-1563. doi:10.1378/chest.128.3.1557
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Objectives: Several investigators have reported that operative mortality in the elderly is acceptable. However, their patients are potentially biased with regard to some factors such as performance status (PS) and comorbidity. In this study, we discuss surgical indications for the elderly and effects on perioperative mortality and prognosis.

Study design: A retrospective study was carried out by reviewing the records of 1,114 patients who were referred for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer between January 1993 and December 2002. The patients were classified into younger (≤ 75 years of age) and elderly (≥ 76 years of age) groups. The histologic subtype, TNM stage, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group PS, and treatment were reviewed for members of each group, and the proportion of patients who underwent surgery was compared between the two groups. The surgical procedures, perioperative mortality, and prognosis of the two groups were also compared.

Results: There was a significant difference in the histologic distribution with no difference in TNM staging between the two groups. Regarding treatment, 51.0% of those in the younger group and 36.1% of those in the elderly group underwent surgery. The proportion of elderly patients who underwent surgery was significantly lower than that of the younger patients, mainly due to worse PS and comorbidity in the elderly patients. The perioperative mortality rates for the younger and elderly groups were 0.9% and 4.1%, respectively, with no significant difference, and the overall survival was similar between the two groups.

Conclusions: When compared to younger patients, fewer elderly patients underwent surgery because of worse PS and comorbidity. However, in elderly patients with good PS and no comorbidity, the rate of perioperative mortality and the prognosis were similar to those in the younger patients. Therefore, advanced age only is not a negative factor for surgery in elderly patients.

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