0
Preliminary Report |

Feasibility and Variability of Neonatal and Infant Lung Function Measurement Using the Single Occlusion Technique*

Nienke Katier, MD; Cuno S. P. M. Uiterwaal, MD, PhD; Brita M. de Jong, MD; Jan L. L. Kimpen, MD, PhD; Cornelis K. van der Ent, MD, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Departments of Pediatric Pulmonology (Drs. Katier, de Jong, and van der Ent), Pediatric Infectious Disease (Dr. Kimpen), and Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care (Dr. Uiterwaal), University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Correspondence to: Cornelis K. van der Ent, MD, PhD, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Internal Postal Code: KH 01.419.0, PO Box 85090, 3508 AB Utrecht, the Netherlands; e-mail: k.vanderent@wkz.azu.nl



Chest. 2005;128(3):1822-1829. doi:10.1378/chest.128.3.1822
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Introduction: For possible use as a predictor of wheezing illnesses in routine care, we evaluated the feasibility and variability of measurement of passive respiratory mechanics in a large, open population of healthy neonates and infants.

Methods: As part of the ongoing Wheezing Illnesses Study Leidsche Rijn, respiratory compliance (Crs), respiratory resistance (Rrs), and time constant (τrs) were measured during natural sleep in 450 healthy term neonates and infants using the single-occlusion technique (SOT). Interobserver and intraobserver variability of data sampling and the subsequent selection and analysis of occlusions as well as intrameasurement variability were examined.

Results: Technically acceptable lung function measurements could be performed in 328 infants (73%). Low intraobserver and interobserver variability was found for both data sampling (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] ≥ 0.87) and for selection and analysis of occlusions (ICC ≥ 0.99). Intrameasurement variability was low, with a mean intrameasurement coefficients of variation for Crs, Rrs, and τrs of 8.5%, 10.4%, and 15.4%, respectively. Averaging three or more occlusions resulted in stable values of Crs, Rrs, and τrs.

Conclusion: Results of this study indicate that feasibility and variability of lung function testing using the SOT is acceptable for use in large populations of healthy neonates and infants in routine care.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543