0
Editorials |

Adverse Drug Reactions in the ICU : Lessons Learned

Basim A. Dubaybo, MD, FCCP; John D. Dingell
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: VAMC and Wayne State University School of Medicine
 ,  Dr. Dubaybo is Professor and Assistant Dean, Wayne State University School of Medicine, and Chief of Staff, John D. Dingell VAMC.

Correspondence to: Basim A. Dubaybo, MD, FCCP, Professor and Assistant Dean, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 3990 John R, 3-Hudson, Harper University Hospital, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201; e-mail: bdubaybo@med.wayne.edu



Chest. 2005;128(3):1100-1101. doi:10.1378/chest.128.3.1100
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

The development of an adverse drug reaction (ADR) is a common occurrence in the ICU. Estimates for the incidence of ADRs in ICU patients are variable and have been reported to be as high as 29.7 per 100 admissions in some medical centers.1 As an indication of the global significance of this issue, the World Health Organization2 has published the following definition of ADR: “Any noxious, unintended, and undesired effect of a drug, which occurs at doses used in humans for prophylaxis, diagnosis, or therapy. This excludes therapeutic failures, intentional or accidental poisoning or drug abuse, and adverse effects due to errors in administration or compliance.” Prevention of adverse drug events and emphasizing patient safety are current priorities for the Joint Commission for the Accreditation of Health Care Organizations.3 It is therefore essential for intensivists to understand the magnitude of the problem of ADR in the ICU, its prevalence, its predisposing factors, and methods to minimize it.


Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543