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Editorials |

Quality, Quantity, or Both? : Life After Lung Transplantation

Laurie D. Snyder, MD; Scott M. Palmer, MD, MHS
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: Durham, NC
 ,  Drs. Snyder and Palmer are affiliated with the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Duke University.

Correspondence to: Scott M. Palmer, MD, MHS, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Box 387, 128 Bell Building, Erwin Road, Durham, NC 27710; e-mail: palme002@mc.duke.edu



Chest. 2005;128(3):1086-1087. doi:10.1378/chest.128.3.1086
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Within the past 20 years, lung transplantation has evolved as an effective therapy in the treatment of patients with advanced lung diseases. Unfortunately, long-term lung transplant outcomes remain disappointing compared to those in other solid organ transplant populations.1 The primary reason for the decreased lung transplant patient survival rate is the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), which is a condition of progressive airflow obstruction that is generally thought to reflect chronic lung rejection. Because of this limited survival of patients posttransplant, a greater understanding of the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of lung transplant recipients is critical to evaluate the utility of this therapy. Both cross-sectional studies and prospective studies25 have confirmed that recipients’ experience improved HRQOL after lung transplantation on a variety of validated instruments. In fact, improvements in HRQOL are a major consideration in the decision to offer lung transplantation to patients with several end-stage lung diseases, such as emphysema, in which the actual survival benefit of transplant has been questioned.6


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