0
Bronchoscopy: SURGERY |

Prefixed Equimolar Nitrous Oxide and Oxygen Mixture Reduces Discomfort During Flexible Bronchoscopy in Adult Patients*: A Randomized, Controlled, Double-Blind Trial

Kinan Atassi, MD; Gilles Mangiapan, MD; Claire Fuhrman, MD; Stéphane Lasry, MD; Peter Onody, PharmD; Bruno Housset, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Service de Pneumologie et de Pathologie Professionnelle (Drs. Atassi, Mangiapan, Fuhrman, Lasry, and Housset), CHI de Créteil, Créteil; and Air Liquide Santé International (Dr. Onody), Paris, France.

Correspondence to: Kinan Atassi, MD, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal, Service de Pneumologie, 40 avenue de Verdun, 940000 Créteil, France; e-mail: kinan.atassi@chicreteil.fr



Chest. 2005;128(2):863-868. doi:10.1378/chest.128.2.863
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: Flexible bronchoscopy (FB) is an invasive procedure associated with patient discomfort and frequent nose pain. A simple sedation procedure that does not require the intervention of an anesthetist is of interest. The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to assess efficiency of nitrous oxide inhalation on the reduction of FB-induced discomfort in adult patients.

Design and settings: Two hundred six patients were randomized to receive either a prefixed equimolar nitrous oxide/oxygen mixture (N2O) or a prefixed equimolar nitrogen and oxygen mixture (control). The primary outcome was stress as assessed by pulse rate and systemic BP during the procedure. Secondary outcomes were self-assessed pain using a visual analog scale (VAS) and patient satisfaction based on a questionnaire. Adverse events were recorded.

Results: A significant increase in BP was observed only in the control group (p = 0.003), while pulse rate values did not differ between the two groups. As assessed by the VAS, pain was lower in the N2O group as compared to placebo (p = 0.02). Nose pain and cough were also significantly reduced by N2O. Adverse events, mostly anxiety, were reported in 10 patients.

Conclusion: These results indicate that equimolar N2O inhalation is efficient in reducing patient discomfort and may be an alternative to general anesthesia.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543