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Clinical Investigations: CARDIOLOGY |

Clinical Factors Associated With Persistent Pericardial Effusion After Successful Primary Coronary Angioplasty*

Tetsuro Sugiura, MD, FCCP; Seishi Nakamura, MD; Yoshihiro Kudo, MD; Toshika Okumiya, PhD; Fumiyasu Yamasaki, MD; Toshiji Iwasaka, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Laboratory Medicine (Drs. Sugiura, Kudo, Okumiya, and Yamasaki), Kochi Medical School, Kochi; and Cardiovascular Center (Drs. Nakamura and Iwasaka), Kansai Medical University, Osaka, Japan.

Correspondence to: Tetsuro Sugiura MD, FCCP, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Kochi Medical School, Kohasu Oko-cho Nankoku City, Kochi, Japan 783-8505; e-mail.sugiurat@med.kochi-u.ac.jp



Chest. 2005;128(2):798-803. doi:10.1378/chest.128.2.798
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Study objective: To evaluate the incidence and clinical factors related to the persistence of infarct-associated pericardial effusion (PE) after primary angioplasty.

Design: Consecutive case-series analysis.

Setting: Coronary care unit in a university hospital.

Patients: Three hundred ninety-one consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) who underwent successful primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) at hospital admission.

Interventions: Coronary angiography and primary PTCA on hospital admission and serial echocardiography.

Measurements and results: The status of coronary flow before and after primary PTCA was evaluated by coronary angiography at hospital admission, while PE was studied by echocardiography within 24 h of admission and 1 month after the onset of AMI. PE was present in the acute phase in 76 patients (19%), and patients with PE had a significantly higher incidence of in-hospital death than those without PE (11% vs 2%, p < 0.001). Among 68 patients who had PE in the acute phase and underwent echocardiography 1 month later, PE persisted to 1 month after the onset of AMI (persistent PE) in 26 patients (38%). Patients with persistent PE had a significantly higher incidence of pericardial rub (p = 0.010), Killip class > 1 (p = 0.025), no reflow after PTCA (p = 0.026), lower incidence of collaterals (p = 0.024), and tended to have higher peak creatine kinase (CK) [p = 0.05] levels than those with transient PE. When five variables (peak CK, collaterals, no reflow, pericardial rub, and Killip class > 1) were used in the multivariate analysis, pericardial rub (p = 0.023; odds ratio [OR], 5.45), absence of collaterals (p = 0.011; OR, 0.16), and Killip class > 1 (p = 0.027; OR, 3.80) were the significant variables related to persistent PE.

Conclusions: PE remains a relatively common complication of AMI even in the era of reperfusion therapy and is associated with increased mortality. Furthermore, the presence of a pericardial rub, Killip class > 1, and absence of collateral flow in the early phase of the infarct are associated with persistence of the PE to 1 month after the onset of AMI.


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