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Clinical Investigations: SLEEP |

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Morbid Obesity*: Effects of Intragastric Balloon

Luca Busetto, MD; Giuliano Enzi, MD; Emine Meral Inelmen, MD; Gabriella Costa, MD; Valentina Negrin, MD; Giuseppe Sergi, MD; Andrea Vianello, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Obesity Unit (Drs. Busetto, Enzi, Inelmen, Costa, Sergi, and Negrin), Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, and the Unit of Respiratory Pathophysiology (Dr. Vianello), University of Padova, Padova, Italy.

Correspondence to: Luca Busetto, MD, Clinica Medica I-Policlinico Universitario, Via Giustiniani 2, 35128 Padova, Italy; e-mail: luca.busetto@unipd.it



Chest. 2005;128(2):618-623. doi:10.1378/chest.128.2.618
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Study objectives: In obese patients, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is attributed to a reduction in pharyngeal cross-sectional area due to peripharyngeal fat deposition. The effect of weight loss on the size of the upper airways of obese subjects is still unknown. We analyzed the pharyngeal cross-sectional area before and after weight loss in morbidly obese patients with OSAS.

Design, setting, and subjects: A group of 17 middle-aged, morbidly obese men was evaluated by anthropometry and cardiorespiratory sleep studies before and after weight loss obtained by insertion of an intragastric balloon. The pharyngeal cross-sectional area was measured by acoustic pharyngometry.

Results: The mean (± SD) body mass index was 55.8 ± 9.9 kg/m2 at baseline and 48.6 ± 11.2 kg/m2 at the time of balloon removal (6 months after insertion) [p < 0.001]. At baseline, patients had visceral obesity, large necks, and severe OSAS. Weight loss was associated with a significant mean reduction of waist circumference (156.4 ± 17.6 vs 136.7 ± 18.4 cm, respectively; p < 0.001), sagittal abdominal diameter (37.8 ± 3.0 vs 32.3 ± 4.0 cm, respectively; p < 0.001), and neck circumference (51.1 ± 3.7 vs 47.9 ± 4.3 cm, respectively; p < 0.001). Moreover, weight loss induced a nearly complete resolution of OSAS (apnea-hypopnea index, 52.1 ± 14.9 vs 14.0 ± 12.4 events/h, respectively; p < 0.001). At baseline, obese patients had significantly lower pharyngeal cross-sectional areas compared to a group of 20 nonobese male control subjects, both in the upright and supine position, at different levels of the pharynx. In obese patients, the weight loss induced by the positioning of the intragastric balloon was associated with an increase in the size of the upper airway passage. After weight loss, both the mean pharyngeal cross-sectional area and the area at glottis level were still lower in obese subjects than in nonobese subjects; however, the pharyngeal cross-sectional area at the oropharyngeal junction was similar in the two groups.

Conclusions: Morbidly obese men with OSAS have a reduced pharyngeal cross-sectional area. A weight reduction of about 15% of baseline body weight may substantially increase the pharyngeal cross-sectional area and substantially improve the severity of OSAS in morbidly obese subjects with sleep apnea.

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