0
Clinical Investigations in Critical Care |

Follow-up Study on Pulmonary Function and Lung Radiographic Changes in Rehabilitating Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Patients After Discharge*

Lixin Xie, MD, PhD; Youning Liu, MD, PhD; Yueyong Xiao, MD, PhD; Qing Tian, MD; Baoxing Fan, PhD; Hong Zhao, MD; Weijun Chen, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Departments of Respiratory Medicine (Drs. Xiao and Zhao) and Radiology (Drs. Xie, Liu, Tian, and Fan) Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing; and BGI-GBI Biotech Company (Dr. Chen), Beijing, Peoples Republic of China.

Correspondence to: Youning Liu, MD, PhD, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Rd, Beijing 100853, ROC; e-mail: liuyn@301hospital.com.cn



Chest. 2005;127(6):2119-2124. doi:10.1378/chest.127.6.2119
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Objectives: To follow-up on the changes in lung function and lung radiographic pictures of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) patients discharged from Xiaotangshan Hospital in Beijing (by regularly receiving examination), and to analyze retrospectively the treatment strategy in these patients.

Methods: Surviving SARS patients were seen at least twice within 3 months after discharge and underwent SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) IgG antibody testing, pulmonary function testing, and chest radiography and/or high-resolution CT (HRCT) examinations at Chinese PLA General Hospital. The treatments received at Xiaotangshan Hospital were analyzed retrospectively and were correlated to later status.

Results: Positive SARS-Co virus IgG antibody results were seen in 208 of 258 patients, with 21.3% (55 of 258 patients) still having a pulmonary diffusion abnormality (Dlco < 80% of predicted). By comparing the 155 survivors with positive SARS-CoV IgG antibody results and Dlco ≥ 80% predicted with the 50 patients with negative SARS-CoV IgG results, we found that 53 patients with positive SARS-CoV IgG results and a lung diffusion abnormality had endured a much longer course of fever and received larger doses of glucocorticoid, as well as higher ratios of oxygen inhalation and noninvasive ventilation treatment. For these patients, 51 of 53 patients with positive SARS-CoV IgG results and a lung diffusion abnormality underwent pulmonary function testing after approximately 1 month. Dlco improved in 80.4% of patients (41 of 51 patients). Of the patients with a lung diffusion abnormality, 40 of 51 patients showed lung fibrotic changes in the lung image examination and 22 patients (55%) showed improvement in lung fibrotic changes 1 month later.

Conclusion: These findings suggest that lung fibrotic changes caused by SARS disease occurred mostly in severely sick patients and may be self-rehabilitated. Dlco scores might be more sensitive than HRCT when evaluating lung fibrotic changes.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543