0
Clinical Investigations: LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS |

Fade of Pulmonary Function During Residual Neuromuscular Blockade*

Matthias Eikermann, MD; Harald Groeben, MD; Barbara Bünten, MD; Jürgen Peters, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Klinik für Anästhesiologie und Intensivmedizin, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Essen, Germany.

Correspondence to: Matthias Eikermann, MD, Klinik für Anästhesiologie und Intensivmedizin, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, D-45122 Essen, Germany; e-mail: matthias.eikermann@uni-essen.de



Chest. 2005;127(5):1703-1709. doi:10.1378/chest.127.5.1703
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Objectives: A decrement in evoked muscle force with repetitive nerve stimulation (fade) suggests impaired neuromuscular transmission. We tested the hypothesis that fade of pulmonary function, ie, a decrease in values of FVC with the second spirometric maneuver compared to the first maneuver, occurs during impaired neuromuscular transmission.

Design: Prospective study.

Participants: Six healthy male volunteers.

Interventions: A series of three consecutive spirometric maneuvers was performed every 5 min in six awake healthy volunteers before, during, and after partial paralysis evoked by rocuronium (0.01 mg/kg IV plus 2 to 8 μg/kg/min).

Measurements and results: We measured FVC, FEV1, forced inspiratory volume in 1 s (FIV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and peak inspiratory flow (PIF) by spirometry, and force of adductor pollicis muscle by mechanomyography (train-of-four [TOF] stimulation). A statistically significant fade (reduction of the second maneuver from the first maneuver) of FVC, FEV1, FIV1, PEF, and PIF was observed during neuromuscular blockade. With peak relaxation (TOF ratio, 0.5) fade amounted to medians of 10% (interquartile range [IQR], 9 to 23%), 7% (IQR, 2 to 16%), 31 (IQR, 19 to 47%), 9% (IQR, 3 to 24%), and 30% (IQR, 5 to 43%), respectively. A fade of ≥ 10% was always associated with a clinically relevant (≥ 10%) FVC reduction from baseline (ie, FVC before rocuronium administration). However, FVC reduction from baseline was still present in 23% of measurements without a relevant FVC fade.

Conclusions: A clinically relevant fall (fade) in FVC from the first to the second value during or after neuromuscular blockade suggests impaired pulmonary function and may be due to muscle paralysis. For this reason, the first (best) FVC value may overestimate pulmonary function and expose the patient to an unidentified risk.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543