0
Clinical Investigations: LUNG CANCER |

The Role of Whole-Body Bone Scanning and Clinical Factors in Detecting Bone Metastases in Patients With Non-small Cell Lung Cancer*

Serdar Erturan, MD; Mustafa Yaman, MD, FCCP; Günay Aydın, MD; Işıl Uzel, MD; Benan Müsellim, MD; Kamil Kaynak, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Departments of Pulmonology (Drs. Erturan, Yaman, Aydın, Uzel, and Müsellim) and Thoracic Surgery (Dr. Kaynak), Cerrahpaşa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Correspondence to: Serdar Erturan, MD, Nevşehirli İbrahim Paşa Cad. 26/4 Fatih, 34230 Istanbul, Turkey; e-mail: serdarerturan@mynet.com



Chest. 2005;127(2):449-454. doi:10.1378/chest.127.2.449
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: Correct detection of bone metastases in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is crucial for prognosis and selection of an appropriate treatment regimen. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of whole-body bone scanning (WBBS) and clinical factors in detecting bone metastases in NSCLC.

Design and patients: One hundred twenty-five patients with a diagnosis made between 1998 and 2002 were recruited (squamous cell carcinoma, 54.4%; adenocarcinoma, 32.8%; non-small cell carcinoma, 8.8%; large cell carcinoma, 4%). Clinical factors suggesting bone metastasis (skeletal pain, elevated alkaline phosphatase, hypercalcemia) were evaluated. WBBS was performed in all patients, and additional MRI was ordered in 10 patients because of discordance between clinical factors and WBBS findings.

Measurements and results: Bone metastases were detected in 53% (n = 21) of 39 clinical factor-positive patients, 5.8% (n = 5) of 86 clinical factor-negative patients, and 20.8% of total patients. The existence of bone-specific clinical factors as indicators of metastasis presented 53.8% positive predictive value (PPV), 94.2% negative predictive value (NPV), and 81.6% accuracy. However, the findings of WBBS showed 73.5% PPV, 97.8% NPV, and 91.2% accuracy. Adenocarcinoma was the most common cell type found in patients with bone metastasis (39%). The routine bone scanning prevented two futile thoracotomies (8%) in 25 patients with apparently operable lung cancer.

Conclusions: In spite of the high NPV of the bone-specific clinical factors and the high value obtained in the false-positive findings in the bone scan, the present study indicates that in patients for whom surgical therapy is an option, preoperative staging using WBBS can be helpful to avoid misstaging due to asymptomatic bone metastases.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
Noninvasive Staging of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer*: A Review of the Current Evidence
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543