0
Clinical Investigations: SARCOIDOSIS |

Long-term Follow-up CT Scan Evaluation in Patients With Pulmonary Sarcoidosis*

Masanori Akira, MD; Takenori Kozuka, MD; Yoshikazu Inoue, MD; Mitsunori Sakatani, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

*From the Departments of Radiology (Drs. Akira and Kozuka) and Internal Medicine (Drs. Inoue and Sakatani), National Hospital Organization, Kinki-chuo Chest Medical Center (former National Kinki Chuo Hospital for Chest Diseases), Sakai City, Osaka, Japan.

Correspondence to: Mitsunori Sakatani, MD, FCCP, Department of Internal Medicine, National Hospital Organization, Kinki-chuo Chest Medical Center, 1180 Nagasone-cho, Sakai City, Osaka 591-8555, Japan; e-mail: Akira@kch.hosp.go.jp



Chest. 2005;127(1):185-191. doi:10.1378/chest.127.1.185
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Objectives: The aim of the present study was to determine how the pattern and extent of sarcoidosis changes over time on serial high-resolution CT (HRCT) scans and to identify CT scan findings that might be helpful in predicting the prognosis of patients with the disease.

Methods: The initial and last HRCT scan findings of 40 patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis during a mean follow-up period of 7.4 years (range, 3 to 18 years) were evaluated retrospectively. HRCT scan findings then were correlated with the pulmonary function tests.

Results: Parenchymal abnormalities in most patients with a predominant nodular pattern (18 patients) and multiple large nodular pattern (8 patients) disappeared or decreased in size on long-term follow-up CT scans. A conglomeration pattern (five patients) shrank and evolved into bronchial distortion. The shrinkage of the conglomeration pattern correlated with a decline of FEV1/FVC ratio, despite an improvement in FVC. A ground-glass opacity pattern (five patients) and a consolidation pattern (three patients) evolved into honeycombing. The evolution of the ground-glass opacity and consolidation patterns into honeycombing occurred along with a decline in FVC, although the parenchymal abnormalities became smaller.

Conclusion: Patients with a predominantly ground-glass opacity pattern and consolidation pattern seen on the initial CT scan had a worse prognosis and were susceptible to developing severe respiratory insufficiency. The predominant patterns seen on the initial HRCT scan may be helpful in predicting the outcomes of patients with sarcoidosis.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Chest Imaging. Clin Chest Med 2015;36(4):603-19.
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543