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Editorials |

Gastroesophageal Reflux as an Asthma Trigger : Acid Stress

Susan M. Harding, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: Birmingham, AL
 ,  Dr. Harding is Associate Professor of Medicine, the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Correspondence to: Susan M. Harding, MD, FCCP, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine, 1900 University Blvd, THT Rm 215, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294; e-mail: sharding@uab.edu



Chest. 2004;126(5):1398-1399. doi:10.1378/chest.126.5.1398
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Extract

Since Sir William Osler recognized that gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a potential asthma trigger more than a century ago, multiple investigations have shown a potential interaction between the esophagus and the lung. Despite this, there are still many unanswered questions as to how these two organs interact. To substantiate this interaction and to begin to examine causality, three criteria should be met. First, GER prevalence should be higher in asthmatic patients than in control subjects. Second, GER should alter airway reactivity and inflammatory markers. And third, GER therapy should improve asthma outcomes. So where do we stand concerning acid stress?12

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