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Clinical Investigations: ASTHMA |

Risk of Physician-Diagnosed Asthma in the First 6 Years of Life*

Natalia Dik, MSc; Robert B. Tate, PhD; Jure Manfreda, MD; Nicholas R. Anthonisen, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Departments of Community Health Sciences (Ms. Dik, and Drs. Tate and Manfreda) and Internal Medicine (Dr. Anthonisen), University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.

Correspondence to: Nicholas Anthonisen, MD, University of Manitoba, Department of Medicine, 810 Sherbrook St, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3A 1R8; e-mail: nanthonisen@exchange.hsc.mb.ca



Chest. 2004;126(4):1147-1153. doi:10.1378/chest.126.4.1147
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Objective: The objective of this cohort study was to determine if complications of pregnancy and labor, characteristics at birth, and exposure to infections influence the incidence of asthma in the first 6 years of life.

Design: We identified all children born between 1980 and 1990 in the Province of Manitoba, Canada. We used records of physician contacts (inpatient and outpatient) and services of the universal provincial health insurance plan to follow up 170,960 children from birth to the age of 6 years to identify the first diagnosis of asthma. Information on mothers and siblings was also obtained to determine family history of disease and exposure to infections.

Results: During the study period, a diagnosis of asthma was made in 14.1% of children by the age of 6 years. The incidence was higher in boys than in girls, in those with family history of allergic diseases. It was higher in urban than in rural areas, and lowest in those born in winter. Asthma was more likely in those with low birth weight and premature birth. Certain congenital abnormalities and complications of pregnancy and labor also increased the risk of asthma. The risk of asthma increased with maternal age. Both upper and lower respiratory infections increased the risk of subsequent asthma, and this effect was more important than exposure to familial respiratory infections, which also tended to increase asthma risk. The risk of asthma decreased with the number of siblings when siblings had a history of allergic disorders.

Conclusions: In addition to genetic influences, intrauterine and labor conditions are determinants of asthma. Exposure to both upper and lower respiratory tract infections increases the risk; these infections do not explain the protective effect associated with the increasing number of siblings.

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asthma

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