0
Clinical Investigations: SURGERY |

Follow-up of Adults With Coarctation of the Aorta*: Comparison of Helical CT and MRI, and Impact on Assessing Diameter Changes

Alfred Hager, MD; Harald Kaemmerer, MD, VMD, PhD; Andreas Leppert, MD; Matthias Prokop, MD, PhD; Sebastian Blücher, MD; Heiko Stern, MD, PhD; John Hess, MD, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Klinik für Kinderkardiologie und angeborene Herzfehler (Drs. Hager, Kaemmerer, Blücher, Stern, and Hess), Deutsches Herzzentrum München, Klinik an der Technischen Universität München, München, Germany; Diagnostische Radiologie (Dr. Leppert), Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany; and Universitätsklinik für Radiodiagnostik (Dr. Prokop), Universität Wien, Wien, Austria.

Correspondence to: Alfred Hager, MD, Klinik für Kinderkardiologie und angeborene Herzfehler, Deutsches Herzzentrum München, Technische Universität München, Lazarettstr 36, D-80636 München, Germany; e-mail: hager@dhm.mhn.de



Chest. 2004;126(4):1169-1176. doi:10.1378/chest.126.4.1169
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Objectives: To compare images of the aorta obtained with helical CT (HCT) scanning and MRI for the follow-up of adults with coarctation of the aorta (CoA).

Design: Longitudinal study.

Setting: Department of adult congenital heart disease in a tertiary university hospital.

Patients: A total of 37 adults (age range, 16 to 68 years; women, 13) with CoA (after surgery, 34 patients; native, 2 patients; after balloon-angioplasty, 1 patient)

Measurements and results: All patients underwent both HCT and MRI of the thoracic aorta within a mean (± SD) time interval of 1.86 ± 1.11 years. Aortic diameters measured at six intrathoracic levels showed a high correlation (r = 0.79 to 0.94). On average, slightly lower diameters were measured with MRI (1.2 mm). But there was a substantial variation between the two measurements with differences of up to 9 mm. All other pathomorphologic abnormalities were detected and classified similarly with both methods.

Conclusions: HCT and MRI are similarly useful for the noninvasive evaluation of the thoracic aorta in patients with CoA. But there can be a substantial variation in two subsequent measurements without an overall substantial bias toward larger diameter in one of the two methods. In repetitive studies, changes of the diameters should be interpreted with care, especially when assessing the progression of aortic diameters.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
Venous thromboembolism (VTE).
University of Michigan Health System | 7/31/2009
Management of cervical cancer.
Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network | 6/6/2008
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543