0
Clinical Investigations: COPD |

Mechanisms of Improvement in Exercise Capacity Using a Rollator in Patients With COPD*

Vanessa S. Probst, PT, MSc; Thierry Troosters, PT, PhD; Iris Coosemans, PT; Martijn A. Spruit, PT, MSc; Fabio de Oliveira Pitta, PT, MSc; Marc Decramer, MD, PhD; Rik Gosselink, PT, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Respiratory Division (Dr. Decramer), University Hospital, and Department of Rehabilitation Sciences (Drs. Probst, Troosters, Coosemans, Spruit, and Gosselink), Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; and Departamento de Fisioterapia (Dr. Pitta), Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina-PR, Brasil.

Correspondence to: Rik Gosselink, PT, PhD, Respiratory Rehabilitation and Respiratory Division, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium; e-mail: Rik.Gosselink@uz.kuleuven.ac.be



Chest. 2004;126(4):1102-1107. doi:10.1378/chest.126.4.1102
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objective: We analyzed the effects of the use of a rollator on walking distance and physiologic variables: pulmonary gas exchange, heart rate, minute ventilation (V̇e), oxygen saturation, and symptoms during the 6-min walk test (6MWT) in patients with COPD.

Setting: Outpatient clinic at university hospital.

Patients: Fourteen patients with COPD in stable clinical condition. One patient had mild COPD, five patients had moderate COPD, six patients had severe COPD, and two patients had very severe COPD.

Interventions: Two 6MWTs were performed with a portable metabolic system (V̇maxST 1.0; Viasys Healthcare; MEDA; Aartselaar, Belgium) with a rollator and without a rollator, in random order. In addition, maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV) was measured with and without a rollator, randomly.

Results: The median 6MWT distance increased significantly with a rollator: 416 m without a rollator (interquartile range [IQR], 396 to 435 m), vs 462 m with a rollator (IQR, 424 to 477 m) [p = 0.04]. Significant increases were also seen in oxygen uptake (0.04 L/min [IQR, − 0.002 to 0.09 L/min]); tidal volume (0.06 L/min [IQR, − 0.001 to 0.11 L/min]); and V̇e (0.95 L/min [IQR, − 0.67 to 7.1 L/min]), recorded in the last minute of the 6MWT; as well as in MVV (3 L/min [IQR, 0 to 12 L/min]) [p < 0.05 for all]. Borg dyspnea scores tended to be lower with a rollator: 6 (IQR, 4 to 7) without a rollator, vs 5 (IQR, 4 to 7) with a rollator (p = 0.10). The variation in the 6MWT was explained by individual changes in walking efficiency (partial R2 = 0.31) and changes in V̇e (partial R2 = 0.36) [p model < 0.04].

Conclusion: The use of a rollator improves walking distance of patients with COPD through an increased ventilatory capacity and/or better walking efficiency.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543