0
Clinical Investigations: AIRWAYS |

Adenosine Bronchial Provocation With Computerized Wheeze Detection in Young Infants With Prolonged Cough*: Correlation With Long-term Follow-up

Lea Bentur, MD; Raphael Beck, MD, FCCP; Drora Berkowitz, MD; Jamal Hasanin, MD; Irit Berger, MD; Nael Elias, MD; Noam Gavriely, MD, DSc
Author and Funding Information

*From the Pediatric Pulmonology Unit (Drs. Bentur, Beck, Hasanin, Berger, and Elias) and the Gastroenterology Unit (Dr. Berkowitz), Department of Pediatrics, Meyer Children’s Hospital, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel; and the Department of Physiology and Biophysics (Dr. Gavriely), the Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

Correspondence to: Lea Bentur, MD, Director, Pediatric Pulmonary Unit, Rambam Medical Center, PO Box 9602, Haifa, Israel 31096; e-mail: l_bentur@rambam.health.gov.il



Chest. 2004;126(4):1060-1065. doi:10.1378/chest.126.4.1060
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background: Chronic cough in babies is often associated with bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR). The objective documentation of BHR in babies is difficult, and acoustic methods have been described (provocative concentration of a substance causing wheeze) for conducting bronchial provocation tests (BPTs). We conducted a study to evaluate automatic computerized wheeze detection (CWD) in determining BHR in young infants with prolonged cough, and its correlation with the subsequent development of wheezing.

Methods: Infants aged < 24 months with prolonged cough (ie, > 2 months) underwent acoustic BPTs with the response determined by CWD and auscultation by a physician. Telephone interviews with parents were conducted after 1 month and yearly for the next 3 years.

Results: A total of 28 infants who were 4 to 24 months old with prolonged cough were included in the study. Twenty of these infants (71.4%) had BHR as determined by a positive acoustic BPT result. In 11 of these 20 tests, the CWD occurred earlier, and in 9 tests it occurred at the same step as auscultation by a physician. Rhonchi or whistles often preceded wheezes. Seventeen of the 20 patients with BHR completed 3 years of follow-up. Of these, 14 had recurrent episodes of wheezing and shortness of breath, and 3 were well. Six of the eight adenosine-negative patients completed 3 years of follow-up and had no symptoms of BHR.

Conclusions: Acoustic BPT is a technically feasible test for the detection of BHR in young infants. CWD provides an earlier detection of wheeze than stethoscope auscultation. In our group of infants, a positive acoustic BPT result had high correlation with symptoms compatible with BHR over the next 3 years.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543