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Treatment of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

David S.C. Hui, MD, FCCP; Joseph J.Y. Sung, MD, PhD
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: Shatin, Hong Kong
 ,  Dr. Hui is Associate Professor and Head of the Division of Respiratory Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital. Dr. Sung is Chairman and Chair Professor, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Correspondence to: David S.C. Hui, MD, FCCP, Department of Medicine & Therapeutics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, 30–32 Ngan Shing St, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong; e-mail dschui@cuhk.edu.hk



Chest. 2004;126(3):670-674. doi:10.1378/chest.126.3.670
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Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly emerged infectious disease that has posed an enormous threat to international health. During the global outbreak in 2003, the most severely affected countries were China (ie, mainland China, Hong Kong,1 and Taiwan2), Vietnam, Canada,3 and Singapore.4 On July 5, 2003, the World Health Organization announced that the last known chain of human-to-human transmission of SARS had been broken in Taiwan.5 This brought an end to the initial outbreak of SARS that had begun in mid-November 2002 in southern China and had spread internationally in late February 2003. Genetic analysis showed that the SARS coronavirus (CoV) isolates from Guangzhou shared the same origin with those in other countries, with a phylogenetic pathway that matched the spread of SARS to other parts of the world.6 As of July 31, 2003, 8,098 probable cases had been reported in 29 countries and regions with a death toll of 774 (9.6%).5

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