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Editorials |

How (Why) Does Oxygen Work in Advanced COPD?

Thomas L. Petty, MD, Master FCCP
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: Denver, CO
 ,  Dr. Petty is affiliated with the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and with Rush Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center (Chicago, IL).

Correspondence to: Thomas L. Petty, MD, Master FCCP, 899 Logan St, Suite 203, Denver, CO 80203-3154; e-mail: TLPdoc@aol.com



Chest. 2004;126(3):661-662. doi:10.1378/chest.126.3.661
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Extract

Long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) is established as the standard of care for selected patients with advanced chronic stable hypoxemia.1 A large body of scientific evidence, including two well-defined and well-conducted controlled clinical trials,23 shows that oxygen has a survival benefit. In the Nocturnal Oxygen Therapy Trial (NOTT),2 survival was better in patients who received ambulatory oxygen therapy compared with those assigned to receive oxygen from a stationary source. However, the mean duration of the oxygen therapy was greater for ambulatory oxygen (17.7 vs 11.8 h per day, respectively) than in those assigned to nocturnal and stationary oxygen.2 Thus, the difference in survival could be due to the duration of oxygen therapy, the method (ie, ambulation), or both.

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