0
Clinical Investigations: SLEEP AND BREATHING |

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome, Sleepiness, and Quality of Life*

Marta A. Goncalves, MD; Teresa Paiva, MD; Elizabeth Ramos, MS; Christian Guilleminault, MD, BiolD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Instituto do Sono, Chronobiologia, e Telemedecina Porto (Dr. Gonσalves), Porto, Portugal; the Instituto do Sono, Chronobiologia, e Telemedecina Lisbon (Dr. Paiva), Lisbon, Portugal; the Department of Epidemiology (Ms. Ramos), University Medical School, Porto, Portugal; and Stanford University Sleep Disorders Clinic (Dr. Guilleminault), Stanford, CA.

Correspondence to: Christian Guilleminault, MD, BiolD, Stanford University Sleep Disorders Clinic, 401 Quarry Rd, Suite 3301, Stanford, CA 94305; e-mail: cguil@stanford.edu



Chest. 2004;125(6):2091-2096. doi:10.1378/chest.125.6.2091
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Objective: To evaluate the addition of short arousals of > 3 s on indexes of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and subjective sleepiness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and to evaluate the quality of life and reported difficulty driving with arousal index and indexes of SDB.

Method: Data was collected from a general clinical evaluation, and evaluations using the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS), the sleep disorders questionnaire, the Beck depression inventory (BDI), the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form health survey (SF-36), a questionnaire on driving difficulties and accidents, and polysomnography.

Results: A total of 135 male subjects (mean [± SD] age, 52 ± 12.1 years; mean body mass index [BMI], 27.8 ± 5.6 kg/m2; mean apnea-hypopnea index [AHI], 48.7 ± 26.8 events per hour) were studied. Of these subjects, 70.4% acknowledged having driven while sleepy. ESS scores correlated significantly with the arousal index and AHI, and negatively with the lowest arterial oxygen saturation. The “physical functioning,” “general health,” and “role physical” subscales of the SF-36 correlated with the arousal index. No significant correlation was seen in multiple regression analyses after adjusting for age and BMI, using “reports of sleepiness while driving” as the dependent variable.

Conclusion: Several subjective complaints and subscales of the SF-36 correlated significantly with a frequency of SDB-related arousal of > 3 s. Patients perceived that an organic health problem had been impairing their quality of life more than an emotional problem, despite elevated scores on the BDI. However, if sleepiness while driving was common in OSA patients, it was not significant. Many clinical and polysomnographic variables may be considered as possible independent variables in the regression analysis. Other unrelated factors have a greater impact. To relate sleepiness while driving only to the usually studied variables in OSA patients is an oversimplification.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543