0
Clinical Investigations in Critical Care |

Serum Levels of the Apoptosis-Associated Molecules, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α/Tumor Necrosis Factor Type-I Receptor and Fas/FasL, in Sepsis*

Ivel De Freitas, MD; Máximo Fernández-Somoza, MD; Eva Essenfeld-Sekler, MD; José E. Cardier, MD, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Internal Medicine (Drs. De Freitas, Fernández-Somoza, and Essenfeld-Sekler), Hospital General del Oeste, Caracas; and Laboratorio de Patología Celular y Molecular (Dr. Cardier), Centro de Medicina Experimental, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), Caracas, Venezuela.

Correspondence to: José E. Cardier, MD, PhD, Laboratorio de Patología Celular y Molecular, Centro de Medicina Experimental Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC). Apartado Postal: 21827, Caracas 1020A, Venezuela; e-mail:jcardier@ivic.ve



Chest. 2004;125(6):2238-2246. doi:10.1378/chest.125.6.2238
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: Numerous reports suggest that apoptosis may play an important role in the sepsis syndrome. The objective of the present study was to examine the levels of molecules associated with apoptosis belonging to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α/TNF type-I receptor (TNFRI) and Fas ligand (FasL)/Fas receptor (Fas) pathways in patients with sepsis.

Patients and methods: Twenty-two patients with sepsis (14 patients with severe sepsis and 8 patients with sepsis), and 6 healthy volunteers were evaluated. Sequential analysis of the serum levels of TNF-α, TNFRI, FasL, and Fas were performed in these patients using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

Results: Detectable levels of TNF-α were found in only 8 of 14 patients with severe sepsis. Patients with severe sepsis and sepsis had similarly increased levels of FasL, compared with healthy individuals (p < 0.05). Higher levels of TNFRI and Fas were found in patients with severe sepsis than in patients with sepsis and healthy volunteers (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01, respectively). Fas levels were also higher in patients who died than in those who survived (p < 0.01). A direct relationship was found between serum levels of TNFRI and Fas, and multiorgan dysfunction (sequential organ failure assessment score) [p < 0.0001].

Conclusions: These results suggest that the TNF-α/TNFRI and FasL/Fas systems may be involved in the pathogenesis of sepsis. Serum levels of the death-receptors, TNFRI and Fas, could serve as potential markers of the severity of human sepsis.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543