0
Clinical Investigations: ASTHMA |

Coughing During Mannitol Challenge Is Associated With Asthma*

Heikki O. Koskela, MD; Liisa Hyvärinen, MD; John D. Brannan, PhD; Hak-Kim Chan, PhD; Sandra D. Anderson, PhD, DSc
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Respiratory Medicine (Drs. Koskela and Hyvärinen), Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland; the Department of Respiratory Medicine (Drs. Brannan and Anderson), Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; and the Department of Pharmacy (Dr. Chan), University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Correspondence to: Heikki Koskela, MD, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, PL 1777, 70210 Kuopio, Finland; e-mail: heikki.koskela@kuh.fi



Chest. 2004;125(6):1985-1992. doi:10.1378/chest.125.6.1985
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: To define whether coughing during mannitol challenge is a nonspecific side effect of this challenge or is associated with asthma.

Design: A prospective study.

Setting: University hospital.

Participants: Thirty-seven steroid-naive, asthmatic subjects and 10 healthy subjects.

Measurements: The participants completed a symptom questionnaire, recorded peak expiratory flows (PEFs), and underwent spirometry, skin tests, and bronchial provocations with mannitol, histamine, and cold air. Seventeen of the asthmatic subjects were treated with budesonide, 800 μg per day, and the measurements were repeated after 3 and 6 months of treatment. Coughs were recorded during the mannitol challenges, and the cough sensitivity was expressed as the cumulative number of coughs divided by the cumulative dose of mannitol.

Results: The asthmatic subjects coughed more during the mannitol challenge than the healthy subjects (8.3 coughs per 100 mg [95% confidence interval (CI), 6.2 to 11.0] vs 1.1 coughs per 100 mg [95% CI, 0.4 to 3.0]; p < 0.0001). Even those asthmatic subjects who did not develop bronchoconstriction after the maximal cumulative dose of mannitol (635 mg) coughed significantly more than the healthy subjects (53 coughs [95% CI, 34 to 72] vs 12 coughs [95% CI, 4 to 21]; p = 0.003). Budesonide treatment decreased the cough sensitivity (p = 0.023), which was significantly associated with improvements in overall symptom frequency, cough frequency, diurnal PEF variation, FEV1, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

Conclusions: Coughing during mannitol challenge is associated with asthma and occurs independently of bronchoconstriction. It can be used to study the mechanisms of asthmatic cough. Furthermore, the measurement of the mannitol-provoked coughing may be useful both in the diagnosis of asthma as well as in the assessment of the effects of an anti-inflammatory therapy on this common disorder.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543