0
Articles |

Experience With Surgical Intervention for Screening-Detected Lung Cancer*

Masahiro Tsuboi, MD; Norihiko Ikeda, MD; Harubumi Kato, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

*From Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan.

Correspondence to: Mashahiro Tsuboi, MD, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Tokyo Medical University, 6–7–1, Nishishinjuku, Shinjuku-Ku, Tokyo, Japan 160-0023



Chest. 2004;125(5_suppl):167S. doi:10.1378/chest.125.5_suppl.167S
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

In Japan, a lung cancer screening program using high-resolution CT (HRCT) has been employed for approximately 10 years. In the past decade, the detection of peripheral tumors < 2 cm in size has increased significantly because of CT examinations. In order to clarify the efficacy of the surgical intervention for screening-detected lung cancer, the surgical experiences in Tokyo Medical University were retrospectively analyzed.

Seven hundred eighty-three patients with lung cancer were treated surgically in our hospital during the past 5 years. Among them were 150 patients with peripheral nodules < 2 cm in diameter; of these 150 patients, 135 nodules were adenocarcinoma. Lobectomies were performed in 93 patients, and limited resections including video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery were performed in 42 patients; 2.5% of the patients with tumors < 1 cm in diameter had already showed N2 disease. In the patients with nodules between 1 cm and 1.5 cm and between 1.5 cm and 2 cm, lymph node involvement was recognized in 8.1% and 12%, respectively. In 16 patients who showed 100% ground-glass attenuation (GGA) and 21 patients who had between 50% and 100% GGA, there was no lymph node metastasis. In the patients with no GGA findings, the presence of lymph node metastases was not related to the size of the tumor. Five-year survival rate in the tumors < 1 cm, between 1 cm and 1.5 cm, and between 1.5 cm and 2 cm were 100%, 86.5%, and 92.4%, respectively. In the patients expressing > 50% GGA, a 100% 5-year survival rate was obtained; the patients showing < 50% GGA had 91.1% 5-year survival rate. In terms of surgical procedures, the 5-year survival rate was 100% in limited operation and 91.5% in lobectomy.

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Cough It Up: A Health Care Paradox. JAMA 2016;316(14):1449-1450.
Postoperative radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2016;10():CD002142.
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543