0
Articles |

Chemoprevention of Lung Cancer in Transgenic Mice*

Ronald A. Lubet, PhD; Zhongqiu Zhang, MD, PhD; Yian Wang, MD, PhD; Ming You, MD, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From Chemoprevention Branch (Dr. Lubet), National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD; and Department of Surgery and The Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center (Drs. Zhang, Wang, and You), Campus Box 8109, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.

Correspondence to: Ronald A. Lubet, PhD, Chemoprevention Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892; e-mail: lubetr@mail.nih.gov



Chest. 2004;125(5_suppl):144S-147S. doi:10.1378/chest.125.5_suppl.144S
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in men and women in the United States.1 Epidemiologic and laboratory animal model studies25 have demonstrated that smoking and environmental exposure to carcinogens are closely linked to increased lung cancer risk. Tobacco exposure has been implicated in 90% of lung carcinomas, and smokers have a 20-fold greater risk of acquiring lung cancer compared with persons who have never smoked.6 Although approximately one half of all people who had ever smoked are now former smokers, many people are unable or unwilling to stop smoking. For these reasons, chemoprevention is a potentially important approach to reduce the large number of tobacco-caused cancer deaths, especially for former smokers. Chemoprevention is the use of pharmacologic or natural agents to inhibit the development of cancer. A primary mode of chemoprevention action includes reversing the progression of premalignant cells by stimulation of the cell to repair DNA or other cell damage that initiates carcinogenesis. Numerous studies have found chemoprevention methods can prevent or improve the outcome of a wide variety of cancer.7 This approach is especially useful in targeting persons at high risk for cancer, such as patients who have a genetic predisposition to cancer, or patients who are at high risk for secondary primary tumors after surgical removal of a tumor.7 The targets for pharmacologic intervention are the various stages of tumor development, including hyperplasia and dysplasia. There are two major classes of cancer chemopreventive agents: blocking agents and suppressing agents.810 Blocking agents prevent metabolic activation of carcinogens to reduce the likelihood of DNA damage. Suppressing agents can block expansion of carcinogen-initiated cells by suppressing cell replication or by causing apoptosis of precancerous or cancerous cells.

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543