0
Clinical Investigations: COUGH |

Gender Differences in Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients Complaining of Chronic Cough*

Cynthia T. French; Kenneth E. Fletcher; Richard S. Irwin
Author and Funding Information

*From the Departments of Medicine (Ms. French and Dr. Irwin) and Psychiatry (Dr. Fletcher), University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA.

Correspondence to: Richard S. Irwin, MD, FCCP, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, 55 Lake Ave North, Worcester, MA 01655; e-mail: IrwinR@ummhc.org



Chest. 2004;125(2):482-488. doi:10.1378/chest.125.2.482
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: To confirm that more women than men who complain of chronic cough seek medical attention, to determine whether the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of these women is more adversely affected than men, and to determine whether there are gender differences in the ways that chronic cough adversely affects HRQOL.

Design: Analysis of previously, prospectively collected data, but not previously analyzed or reported data, plus additional prospectively collected data to enrich the database to make meaningful gender comparisons.

Setting: Cough clinic in an academic, tertiary care medical center.

Participants: Subjects seeking medical attention complaining of cough of at least 8 weeks duration and a control group of smokers not complaining of cough.

Measurements: Assessment of chronic cough on HRQOL utilizing a valid and reliable cough-specific HRQOL instrument, the cough-specific quality-of-life questionnaire (CQLQ).

Interventions: All subjects completed the CQLQ prior to any contact with the cough specialist and medical intervention.

Results: In the original cohort of subjects, women (116 subjects) outnumbered the men (38 subject) by 3:1 (p < 0.0001). In the current study, total CQLQ scores for women were higher than for men (67.1 vs 59.7, respectively; p = 0.002). Women had higher scores than men in three of six subscales, as follows: physical complaints (21.6 vs 19.0, respectively; p = 0.004); psychosocial issues (14.7 vs 12.9, respectively; p = 0.002); and extreme physical complaints (8.9 vs 6.6, respectively; p < 0.001). Men and women had similar scores on the remaining subscales. Women scored significantly higher on 10 of the 28 items that make up the six subscales. The item that showed the greatest disparity and the most significant difference between women and men was wetting the pants (p < 0.001) as a result of chronic coughing.

Conclusions: Women with chronic cough were probably more inclined to seek medical attention than men because their HRQOL was more adversely affected and because they were more apt to suffer from physical complaints such as stress incontinence, which provoked psychosocial issues such as becoming embarrassed.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
Impact of Cough Across Different Chronic Respiratory Diseases*: Comparison of Two Cough-Specific Health-Related Quality of Life Questionnaires
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543