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Clinical Investigations: SURGERY |

Resection of the Right Middle Lobe and Lingula in Children for Middle Lobe/Lingula Syndrome*

Adel K. Ayed
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, and Chest Diseases Hospital, Kuwait.

Correspondance to: Adel K. Ayed, MD, FCCP, Associate Professor, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, PO Box 24923, 13110 Safat, Kuwait; e-mail: Adel@hsc.kuniv.edu.kw



Chest. 2004;125(1):38-42. doi:10.1378/chest.125.1.38
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Study objectives: To review our experience with specific characteristics, indications, and results of pulmonary resection in children with middle lobe/lingula syndrome.

Design: Retrospective cohort study.

Setting: Thoracic Surgery Department, Chest Diseases Hospital, Kuwait.

Patients and intervention: Thirteen children with middle lobe, lingula, or both syndromes were treated with pulmonary resection from January 1995 to December 1999.

Results: The mean age was 7.5 years (range, 5 to 10 years). Eight patients were girls, and five were boys. All patients underwent high-resolution CT and bronchoscopy. Bronchiectasis and atelectasis of right middle lobe, lingula, or both was noted in nine patients. Bronchial stenosis and inflammation of the bronchus was found endoscopically in four patients. The indications for surgery were recurrent respiratory tract infection with persistent atelectasis and bronchiectasis in nine patients, and recurrent respiratory tract infection with bronchiectasis in four patients. A right middle lobectomy was done on seven patients and a lingulectomy on four patients. Two patients underwent staged thoracotomies (right middle lobectomy and lingulectomy). There were no operative deaths. Only two patients had postoperative complications: atelectasis (n = 1), and pneumothorax (n = 1). Mean follow-up was 3.5 years (range, 3 to 5 years) for all patients. Nine patients were asymptomatic, and four patients had improved.

Conclusion: Right middle lobe or lingula syndrome with the presence of bronchiectasis, bronchial stenosis, or failure of lung to re-expand are indications for early pulmonary resection.

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