0
Editorials |

Low Voltage With Pericardial Effusion : Complexity of Mechanisms

David H. Spodick
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: Worcester, MA
 ,  Dr. Spodick is Professor of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School Director, Cardiovascular Medicine Fellowship Program, Saint Vincent Hospital.

Correspondence to: David H. Spodick, MD, DSc, FCCP, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Cardiovascular Medicine Fellowship Program, Saint Vincent Hospital, 20 Worcester Central Building, Worcester, MA 01608; e-mail: David.Spodick@tenethealth.com



Chest. 2003;124(6):2044-2045. doi:10.1378/chest.124.6.2044
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

In this issue of CHEST (see page 2064), Japan’s leading investigator of pericardial disease, Tetsuro Sugiura, MD, and his colleagues contribute a unique report of patients free of heart disease with asymptomatic pericardial effusions, small to large, some of whom had PR segment and ST-T wave changes. The report raises as many questions as it answers, and these will require further investigation. By standard definition, 32 of 121 patients had low voltage QRS. In the entire group, widespread ST-segment elevation was found in only 8 patients, and widespread PR-segment depression in 32 patients. PR-segment depressions were significantly more frequent in those with low QRS voltage than in those free of low voltage (more cases may have escaped detection when low voltage applied to more than the QRS complexes).1 The authors appropriately lumped moderate and large pericardial effusions, as it has been shown that the physiologic effect—increased ventricular interaction—of even asymptomatic effusions was similar in moderate-to-large effusions as opposed to small effusions.2

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543