0
Clinical Investigations: NITRIC OXIDE |

Exhaled Nitric Oxide as a Predictor of Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction*

Samy M. ElHalawani; Nam T. Ly; Richard T. Mahon; Dennis E. Amundson
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Internal Medicine (Drs. ElHalawani, Mahon, and Amundson), Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Naval Medical Center San Diego, San Diego, CA; and National Naval Medical Center (Dr. Ly), Bethesda, MD.

Correspondence to: Richard T. Mahon, MD, c/o Clinical Investigation Department (KCA), Naval Medical Center San Diego, 34800 Bob Wilson Dr, Ste. 5, San Diego, CA 92134-1005; e-mail: rtmahon@nmcsd.med.navy.mil



Chest. 2003;124(2):639-643. doi:10.1378/chest.124.2.639
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Introduction: Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is present in 40 to 90% of patients with asthma. Exhaled NO (eNO) levels have been correlated with bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, and have correlated with the degree of decrease in FEV1 with exercise. The purpose of our study was to examine whether eNO measurements prior to or after exercise could be used as a surrogate marker of exertional bronchoconstriction in a population referred specifically for the evaluation of EIB.

Methods: We studied 50 consecutive subjects without a history of asthma who were referred for the clinical evaluation of EIB. eNO levels were measured prior to exercise challenge and every 5 min for a total of 30 min after exercise. Forced expiratory flows were measured prior to and serially after exercise challenge.

Results: Seven subjects had a decrease in FEV1 of ≥ 15% with exercise. The mean eNO level prior to exercise was 41 parts per billion (ppb) [median ± SD, 23 ± 42.2 ppb] in the EIB group and 25.6 ppb (median, 19.95 ± 18.47 ppb) in the group without EIB. A receiver operator characteristic curve yielded a value of 0.636. When using an eNO level of < 12 ppb, the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value for EIB were 1.0, 0.31, 0.19, and 1.0, respectively; therefore, no one with a baseline eNO of < 12 ppb demonstrated EIB.

Conclusions: No subjects with very low pre-exercise eNO levels (< 12 ppb) demonstrated bronchial hyperresponsiveness to exercise. eNO measurement may obviate the need for bronchoprovocation testing in patients who complain of exertional dyspnea.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543