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Clinical Investigations: ASTHMA |

Leisure-Time Physical Activity Patterns Among US Adults With Asthma*

Earl S. Ford; Gregory W. Heath; David M. Mannino; Stephen C. Redd
Author and Funding Information

*From the Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects (Drs. Ford, Mannino, and Redd), National Center for Environmental Health, and the Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity (Dr. Heath), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

Correspondence to: Earl Ford, MD, MPH, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd, MS E17, Atlanta, GA 30333; email: esf2@cdc.gov



Chest. 2003;124(2):432-437. doi:10.1378/chest.124.2.432
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Published online

Background: Little is known about the physical activity patterns among US adults who have asthma.

Methods: Using data for 165,123 respondents of the 2000 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we examined leisure-time physical activity.

Results: After adjusting for age, about 30% of participants with current asthma (12,489 participants), 24% with former asthma (4,892 participants), and 27% who never had asthma (147,742 participants) were considered to be inactive (p < 0.001). After adjusting for age, the estimated energy expenditure from leisure-time physical activity was 206 kilocalories (kcal) per week lower among respondents with current asthma than among respondents with former asthma (p < 0.001) and 91 kcal/week lower than respondents who had never had asthma (p < 0.001). About 27% of participants with current asthma, 28% of participants with former asthma, and 28% of participants who had never had asthma were participating in recommended levels of physical activity. Walking was the most frequently reported activity for all three groups (respondents with current asthma, 39%; respondents with former asthma, 39%; and respondents who had never had asthma, 38%. Participants with asthma were less likely to engage in running (p < 0.001), basketball (p = 0.001), golf (p < 0.001), and weightlifting (p = 0.001) but were more likely to use an exercise bicycle (p = 0.035) than were participants without asthma.

Conclusions: Like most US adults, the majority of those with asthma were not meeting the current recommendations for physical activity.


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