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Clinical Investigations: NITRIC OXIDE |

Nitric Oxide Metabolites Are Not Reduced in Exhaled Breath Condensate of Patients With Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia*

Zsuzsanna Csoma; Andrew Bush; Nicola M. Wilson; Louise Donnelly; Beatrix Balint; Peter J. Barnes; Sergei A. Kharitonov
Author and Funding Information

*From the Departments of Thoracic Medicine (Drs. Csoma, Balint, Donnelly, Barnes, and Kharitonov) and Pediatric Respiratory Care (Drs. Bush and Wilson), Imperial College School of Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute, London, UK.

Correspondence to: Peter J. Barnes, DM, Department of Thoracic Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute, Dovehouse St, London, SW3 6LY, United Kingdom; e-mail: p.j.barnes@ic.ac.uk



Chest. 2003;124(2):633-638. doi:10.1378/chest.124.2.633
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Study objectives: To investigate whether nitric oxide (NO) metabolites would be reduced in children affected by primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD).

Design: Single-center observational study.

Patients: Fifteen children with PCD (seven boys; mean [± SEM] age, 10.3 ± 0.7 years; mean FEV1, 73 ± 2.1% predicted) were recruited along with 14 healthy age-matched subjects (seven boys; mean age, 11.5 ± 0.4 years; mean FEV1, 103 ± 5% predicted).

Interventions: We assessed the levels of nitrite (NO2), NO2/NO3 (NO2/NO3), and S-nitrosothiol in exhaled breath condensate, exhaled NO, and nasal NO from children with PCD compared to those in healthy children.

Measurements and results: The mean exhaled and nasal NO levels were markedly decreased in children with PCD compared to those without PCD (3.2 ± 0.2 vs 8.5 ± 0.9 parts per billion [ppb], respectively [p < 0.0001]; 59.6 ± 12.2 vs 505.5 ± 66.8 ppb, respectively [p < 0.001]). Despite the lower levels of exhaled NO in children with PCD, no differences were found in the mean levels of NO2 (2.9 ± 0.4 vs 3.5 ± 0.3 μM, respectively), NO2/NO3 (35.2 ± 5.0 vs 34.3 ± 4.5 μM, respectively), or S-nitrosothiol (1.0 ± 0.2 vs 0.6 ± 0.1 μM, respectively) between children with PCD and healthy subjects.

Conclusion. These findings suggest that NO synthase activity may not be decreased as much as might be expected on the basis of low exhaled and nasal NO levels.

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