0
Clinical Investigations: ASTHMA |

Increased Exhaled 8-Isoprostane in Childhood Asthma*

Eugenio Baraldi; Laura Ghiro; Vania Piovan; Silvia Carraro; Giovanni Ciabattoni; Peter J. Barnes; Paolo Montuschi
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Pediatrics (Drs. Baraldi, Ghiro, Piovan, and Carraro), School of Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy; Department of Drug Sciences (Dr. Ciabattoni), School of Pharmacy, University “G. d’Annunzio”, Chieta, Italy; Department of Thoracic Medicine (Dr. Barnes), Imperial College, School of Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute, London, UK; and Department of Pharmacology (Dr. Montuschi), School of Medicine, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy.

Correspondence to: Paolo Montuschi, MD, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Largo F. Vito, 1, 00168 Rome, Italy;



Chest. 2003;124(1):25-31. doi:10.1378/chest.124.1.25
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: To quantify lung oxidative stress in asthmatic children by measuring concentrations of 8-isoprostane, a marker of oxidative stress, in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), which is a noninvasive method of sampling airway secretions. Secondary objectives were as follows: (1) to measure levels of exhaled prostaglandin (PG) E2, since impaired PGE2 production has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma in adults; and (2) to measure levels of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), which is a marker of airway inflammation.

Design: Single-center, cross-sectional study.

Patients: Twelve healthy children, 12 steroid-naïve asthmatic children, and 30 children in stable condition with mild-to-moderate persistent asthma who were being treated with inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) [average dose, 300 μg per day] were studied.

Interventions: Subjects attended the outpatient clinic on one occasion for the collection of EBC and FeNO measurements.

Measurements and results: 8-Isoprostane and PGE2 concentrations in EBC were measured with specific radioimmunoassays. FeNO was measured online by a chemiluminescence analyzer. 8-Isoprostane was detectable in the EBC of healthy children (mean [± SEM], 34.2 ± 4.5 pg/mL), and its concentrations were increased in both steroid-naïve asthmatic children (mean, 56.4 ± 7.7 pg/mL; p < 0.01) and steroid-treated asthmatic children (mean, 47.2 ± 2.3 pg/mL; p < 0.05). There was no difference in exhaled 8-isoprostane concentrations between the two groups of asthmatic children (p = 0.14). By contrast, exhaled PGE2 concentrations were similar among the three study groups (p = 0.56). FeNO levels were higher in steroid-naïve children with asthma (49.2 ± 9.6 parts per billion [ppb]; p < 0.05) and, to a lesser extent, in steroid-treated asthmatic children (37.8 ± 6.6 ppb; p < 0.05) compared with healthy children (15.2 ± 1.7 ppb).

Conclusions: Lung oxidative stress is increased in children who are in stable condition with asthma, as reflected by increased exhaled 8-isoprostane concentrations. This increase seems to be relatively resistant to treatment with ICSs. Decreased PGE2 lung production is unlikely to play a pathophysiologic role in childhood asthma.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543