0
Clinical Investigations: SURGERY |

Pulmonary Resection in Infants for Congenital Pulmonary Malformation*

Adel K. Ayed; Abdulla Owayed
Author and Funding Information

*From the Departments of Surgery (Dr. Ayed) and Pediatrics (Dr. Owayed), Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, Safat, Kuwait.

Correspondence to: Adel K. Ayed, MD, FCCP, Associate Professor, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, PO Box 24923, 13110, Safat, Kuwait; e-mail: Adel@hsc.kuniv.edu.kw



Chest. 2003;124(1):98-101. doi:10.1378/chest.124.1.98
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: To review our experience with indications, timing, and results of pulmonary resection in infants.

Design: Retrospective cohort study.

Setting: Thoracic Surgery Department, Chest Diseases Hospital, Kuwait.

Patients and intervention: Forty-seven infants with congenital lung diseases were treated with pulmonary resection from January 1993 to December 2000.

Results: The mean age at the time of diagnosis was 90 days (range, 7 days to 11 months). Thirty-four patients were male (72%). Congenital lobar emphysema, congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation, pulmonary sequestration, and atelectasis were seen in 26, 10, 6, and 5 patients, respectively. The indications for surgery were respiratory distress in 32 patients (68%), respiratory tract infections in 12 patients (26%), and the presence of asymptomatic chest radiographic findings in 3 patients (6%). A lobectomy was performed in 42 patients (89%), bilobectomy in 2 patients (4%), left pneumonectomy in 1 patient (2%), and excision of a mass in 2 patients with extralobar sequestration (4%). An emergency lobectomy was performed in seven patients (15%). Only one postoperative death occurred following a left pneumonectomy for extensive congenital adenomatoid malformation due to pulmonary hypertension. Four patients (9%) had postoperative complications: atelectasis (n = 2), prolonged air leak (n = 1), and pneumothorax (n = 1). Mean follow-up was 4 years (range, 1 to 5 years) for all patients. None of the patients had any physical limitations.

Conclusion: Pulmonary resection is indicated for the majority of patients with congenital lung malformations. In case of severe respiratory distress, an emergency lobectomy can be performed safely.


Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543