0
Opinions/Hypotheses |

Does Deficiency of Arylsulfatase B Have a Role in Cystic Fibrosis?*

Joanne K. Tobacman
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA.

Correspondence to: Joanne K. Tobacman, MD, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1081; e-mail: joanne-tobacman@uiowa.edu



Chest. 2003;123(6):2130-2139. doi:10.1378/chest.123.6.2130
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with mutation and abnormal function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) that affects cellular chloride transport. Clinically, CF of the lung is associated with excessive accumulation of secretions, including the sulfated glycosaminoglycans, chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate (DS), both of which contain sulfated N-acetylgalactosamine residues. The sulfatase enzymes, which are a highly conserved group of enzymes with high specificity for designated sulfate groups, include arylsulfatase B, a lysosomal enzyme. Arylsulfatase B, also known as N-acetyl galactosamine 4-sulfatase, can degrade DS and chondroitin-4 sulfate. Previously reported data demonstrated diminished activity of arylsulfatase B in lymphoid cell lines of patients with CF compared to normal control subjects. Frequent infections with Pseudomonas, a sulfatase-producing organism, occur in patients with CF, whereas infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which lacks sulfatase activity, are infrequent. Additional investigation to determine if diminished function of arylsulfatase B is a consistent finding in cells of patients with CF may be informative, and may help to correlate the molecular, biochemical, and clinical characteristics of CF.


Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543