0
Clinical Investigations: SARCOIDOSIS |

Occupational Risk Factors for Sarcoidosis in African-American Siblings*

Gena P. Kucera; Benjamin A. Rybicki; Kandace L. Kirkey; Steven W. Coon; Marcie L. Major; Mary J. Maliarik; Michael C. Iannuzzi
Author and Funding Information

*From the Josephine Ford Cancer Center (Ms. Kucera), the Department of Biostatistics and Research Epidemiology (Dr. Rybicki, Ms. Kirkey, and Mr. Coon), and the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (Ms. Major, and Drs. Maliarik and Iannuzzi), Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI.

Correspondence to: Gena Kucera, MPH, Henry Ford Health System, Josephine Ford Cancer Center, One Ford Pl, 5C, Detroit, MI 48202; e-mail: gkucera1@hfhs.org



Chest. 2003;123(5):1527-1535. doi:10.1378/chest.123.5.1527
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Objectives: To determine whether certain occupations and occupationally related exposures were associated with a history of sarcoidosis in African-American siblings.

Methods: We collected occupational data from 921 African Americans in 273 sibships that had been identified through a sarcoidosis case. Among the 648 siblings of sarcoidosis index cases enrolled, 30 (4.6%) also had a history of sarcoidosis. A detailed job history was obtained for any job held for ≥ 6 months throughout the subject’s life.

Results: Having a usual occupation in education (odds ratio [OR], 2.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07 to 4.44), in metal machining (OR, 7.47; 95% CI, 1.19 to 47.06), and ever working in metalworking, not elsewhere classified (OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.14 to 3.70) were associated with increased sarcoidosis risk. Occupations ever held in the transportation services industry (OR, 12.71; 95% CI, 1.32 to 122.56) and usual occupations in the retail trade industry (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.27 to 0.88) also were associated with sarcoidosis risk. Specific occupational exposures that were associated with sarcoidosis included titanium (OR, 3.15; 95% CI, 1.02 to 9.68) and vegetable dust (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.01 to 3.27), and indoor exposure to high humidity (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13 to 2.02), water damage (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.11 to 2.03), or musty odors (OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.32 to 2.40) for > 1 year.

Conclusion: Individuals who work in occupations with potential metal exposures or in workplaces with high humidity may be at an increased risk for sarcoidosis, but the complexity of occupationally related exposures makes it difficult to identify specific agents by using job titles as a surrogate for exposure. A more detailed exposure assessment of such jobs, along with the incorporation of genetic risk factors, should help to uncover the complex etiology of sarcoidosis.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543