0
Clinical Investigations: PNEUMONIA |

Impact of Initial Antibiotic Choice on Clinical Outcomes in Community-Acquired Pneumonia*: Analysis of a Hospital Claims-Made Database

Richard B. Brown; Paul Iannini; Peter Gross; Mark Kunkel
Author and Funding Information

*From the Baystate Medical Center (Dr. Brown), Springfield, MA; the Danbury Hospital (Dr. Iannini), Danbury CT; the Hackensack University Medical Center (Dr. Gross), Hackensack, NJ; and Roche Laboratories (Dr. Kunkel), Nutley, NJ.

Correspondence to: Richard B. Brown, MD, FCCP, Chief, Infectious Disease Division, Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, MA 01199; e-mail: richard.brown@bhs.org



Chest. 2003;123(5):1503-1511. doi:10.1378/chest.123.5.1503
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background: Much controversy exists regarding the initial choice of antibiotics and selected outcomes for patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP).

Methods: The investigators analyzed a hospital claims-made database to assess the impact of initial antibiotic choice on 30-day mortality, total hospital costs, and hospital length of stay (LOS). Fine risk groups allowed for stratification for variations in the severity of illness. Patients were divided into five monotherapy groups (ie, ceftriaxone, “other” cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, or penicillins) and four groups that received dual therapy (ie, the agents listed above, except macrolides) plus macrolides. Patients also were stratified by age (ie, > 65 years of age and < 65 years of age). Severely ill patients were excluded.

Results: Overall, 44,814 persons met the criteria for inclusion. Among monotherapy patients, those who received macrolides had the least mortality but were the least ill. Patients who received dual therapy generally had shorter LOSs, lower total hospital charges, and decreased mortality compared with those who received monotherapy. Differences among dual-therapy regimens regarding outcomes studies were noted. Patients who were < 65 years of age had lower mortality rates, shorter LOSs, and lower hospital charges than did the more elderly patients. Within this group, those who received dual therapy had better outcomes than those who received monotherapy.

Conclusions: We confirmed the value of dual therapy employing macrolides as a second agent in decreasing mortality from CAP, and we provided similar data regarding shorter LOSs and lower hospital charges. This appears to hold for a younger population. Differences among dual-therapy regimens (all employing macrolides) appear to exist and may be clinically relevant.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
Feverish illness in children: assessment and initial management in children younger than 5 years.
National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health | 8/28/2009
Blepharitis.
American Academy of Ophthalmology | 6/5/2009
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543