0
Clinical Investigations: SURGERY |

Recovery of Self-Reported Functional Capacity After Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery*

Lee M. Pierson; H. James Norton; William G. Herbert; Mary E. Pierson; Warren K. Ramp; Gary M. Kiebzak; John M. Fedor; Joseph W. Cook
Author and Funding Information

*From the Carolinas Medical Center (Drs. Norton, Ramp, Fedor, Kiebzak, and Cook, and Ms. Pierson), Charlotte, NC; and Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise (Mr. Pierson and Dr. Herbert), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA.

Correspondence to: Lee M. Pierson, MS, 215 War Memorial Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061; e-mail: Lpierson@vt.edu



Chest. 2003;123(5):1367-1374. doi:10.1378/chest.123.5.1367
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: This study was conducted to determine the effects of age, gender, comorbid conditions, and exercise on the recovery of self-reported functional capacity after coronary artery surgery, and to identify predictors of 1-year functional capacity.

Patients: One hundred ninety-eight patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

Measurements and results: Self-reported functional capacity was evaluated before surgery, and 3 months and 1 year postoperatively using the Veterans Specific Activity Questionnaire (VSAQ). Patients were classified into groups based on age, gender, comorbid conditions, and postoperative exercise. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to determine if groups differed with respect to functional capacity recovery and multiple linear regression was used to identify predictors of 1-year VSAQ score. A significant time by age interaction was found (p = 0.0001), with a more protracted recovery for older patients. There were significant group effects for gender (p = 0.0001), and presence of comorbid conditions (p = 0.0009); however, there were no time/group interactions for these variables. A significant group effect was found for postoperative exercise (p = 0.0001), with a trend toward group/time interaction (p = 0.096). Predictors of 1-year functional capacity were VSAQ score in the year prior to surgery and performance of regular aerobic exercise in the postoperative period.

Conclusions: This study suggests that older patients attain good self-reported functional outcomes after surgery; however, the time course for recovery is more protracted than for younger patients. Functional capacity in the year prior to surgery and postoperative exercise are key predictors of 1-year functional capacity.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543