0
Laboratory and Animal Investigations |

Pharmacologic Effects of Tobacco Dust Extract on Isolated Guinea Pig Trachea*

E. Neil Schachter, MD, FCCP; Eugenija Zuskin, MD; Satindra Goswami, PhD; Vincent Castranova, PhD; Paul Siegel, PhD; Mike Whitmer, PhD; Aneal Gadgil, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Mount Sinai Hospital (Drs. Schachter, Goswami and Gadgil), New York, NY; Andrija Stampar School of Public Health (Dr. Zuskin), Zagreb, Croatia; and the National Institute for Occupational Health (Drs. Castranova, Siegel, and Whitmer), Morgantown, WV.

Correspondence to: E. Neil Schachter, MD, FCCP, Mount Sinai Hospital, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029-6574; e-mail: NeilSchachter@MSSM.EDU



Chest. 2003;123(3):862-868. doi:10.1378/chest.123.3.862
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objective: To determine the effects of tobacco dust extract (TDE) on isolated guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle.

Design: A controlled, in vitro smooth-muscle study of the effect of pharmacologic agents on TDE.

Methods: The effect of TDE on isolated guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle was tested using water-soluble extracts of dust obtained from machines in a cigarette manufacturing plant. Dose-related contractions of nonsensitized guinea pig trachea were demonstrated using these extracts. The dust extracts contained significant quantities of bacterial components (eg, endotoxin). Pharmacologic studies were performed by pretreating guinea pig tracheal tissue with drugs known to modulate smooth-muscle contraction: atropine, indomethacin, pyrilamine, nordihydroguaretic acid, acivicin, bromophenacyl bromide, 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid-8-(diethylamino)octyl ester, captopril, and capsaicin.

Results: Atropine strikingly reduced the contractile effects of these extracts. Inhibition of contraction by blocking other mediators was less complete. There was no inhibition of contraction by hexamethonium (10−4 mol/L, 10−5 mol/L, 10−6 mol/L), suggesting that nicotine was not the major contractile mediator of TDE. A separate analysis using different molecular weight fractions of TDE indicated that the constrictor activity appears to be primarily in the fraction with a molecular weight < 10 kd. Additionally, the constrictor effect resided entirely in the nonlipid fraction of the extract. We suggest that TDE causes dose-related airway smooth-muscle constriction by nonimmunologic mechanisms involving a variety of airway mediators and possibly cholinergic receptors.

Conclusions: The bronchoconstrictor activity of TDE resides primarily in its low molecular weight, nonlipid fraction, and hexamethonium studies suggest that this agent is not nicotine.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543