0
Selected Reports |

Sleep-Disordered Breathing Associated With Long-term Opioid Therapy*

Robert J. Farney, MD, FCCP; James M. Walker, PhD; Tom V. Cloward, MD, FCCP; Steven Rhondeau, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Intermountain Sleep Disorders Center (Drs. Farney, Walker and Cloward) and Department of Anesthesia/Anesthesia Pain Management Service (Dr. Rhondeau), LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, UT.

Correspondence to: Robert J. Farney, MD, FCCP, Intermountain Sleep Disorders Center, LDS Hospital, 325 Eighth Ave and C St, Salt Lake City, UT 84143; e-mail: rjfmd@msn.com



Chest. 2003;123(2):632-639. doi:10.1378/chest.123.2.632
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Three patients are described who illustrate distinctive patterns of sleep-disordered breathing that we have observed in patients who are receiving long-term, sustained-release opioid medications. Polysomnography shows respiratory disturbances occur predominantly during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and are characterized by ataxic breathing, central apneas, sustained hypoxemia, and unusually prolonged obstructive “hypopneas” secondary to delayed arousal responses. In contrast to what is usually observed in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), oxygen desaturation is more severe and respiratory disturbances are longer during NREM sleep compared to rapid eye movement sleep. Further studies are needed regarding the effects of opioids on respiration during sleep as well as the importance of interaction with other medications and associated risk factors for OSA.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543